This news has been received from: wtop.com

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

If a resident sees an Asian longhorned beetle, they should try to capture it in a jar or a plastic bag and store it in the freezer. (Courtesy Fairfax County government)

It has not yet been detected in Fairfax County, but the county government is asking local residents to be on the lookout for the Asian longhorned beetle, which has been found in other areas of the country and is very destructive to hardwood trees.

This beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) has blue feet, a black body and white spots on its back. It is seen as a major problem as it has no natural predators in the U.S.

“We are very aware of this potential threat to the urban forest in Fairfax County and we are alerting the public to keep their eyes peeled for this beetle,” said Joan Allen, chief of the Forest Pest Branch, Urban Forest Management Division, of the county government.

“Thus far, the beetle has been found in the New York City metro area, Chicago, New Jersey, Toronto, Worcester, Mass., and most recently in Hollywood, S.C.,” Allen said.

When checking trees, residents should look for oozing sap, an accumulation of coarse sawdust around the base of trees, and uniformly round holes that are about 3/8th of an inch in diameter on the trunk or branches.

If a resident sees an Asian longhorned beetle, they should try to capture it in a jar or a plastic bag and store it in the freezer and contact Fairfax County Urban Forest Management Division at 703-324-1770, TTY 711 or email pestmail@fairfaxcounty.gov.

News Source: wtop.com

Tags: asian longhorned beetle insects invasive species pests

Paul Felder to step away from commentary to corner Jared Gordon after team flagged with COVID-19

Next News:

Ventura County Reports 373 New Coronavirus Cases; Health Officials Order Closure Of Gyms, Salons, Places Of Worship

VENTURA (CBSLA) — Ventura County reported 373 newly confirmed coronavirus cases over the weekend, bringing countywide totals to 4,619 cases and 53 virus-related deaths.

A screen onstage shows cars in the parking area during the drive-in live music event ‘Concerts in your Car’ at the Ventura County Fairgrounds and Event Center on July 11. (Photo by Valerie Macon/AFP-Getty)

The news comes the same day Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered the closure of indoor businesses across the state with stricter mandates in county’s on the state’s watchlist — including Ventura — in an effort to slow the spread of the illness.

In light of the statewide mandate, health officials expanded indoor closures in Ventura County to include gyms and fitness centers, places of worship, indoor protests, offices for non-critical infrastructure sectors, personal care services, hair salons and barber shops and indoor malls.

State orders closures of several industries unless they can operate outside or by pick-up. https://t.co/pW02go9QBH. #venturacounty #covid19 pic.twitter.com/h0DeepZEZz

— Ventura County (@CountyVentura) July 13, 2020

Brewpubs, breweries, bars and pubs that do not serve food either outdoors or to go will also have to remain closed in the county.

“Today’s order is effective immediately and the closures will remain in effect until the State Public Health Officer determines it is appropriate to modify the order based on public health conditions,” the county said in a statement.

The county also reported 95 people were hospitalized Monday with 29 being treated in intensive care units with 2,132 active cases under quarantine and 2,434 recoveries.

Ventura County has tested 90,889 people.

Other News

  • Health Officials Report 2 More COVID-19 Deaths And 152 New Cases
  • Squirrel tests positive for bubonic plague in Colorado
  • Tea Street Owners Tackle Racism and Stereotyping During Pandemic
  • Fairfax Co. officer charged in stun gun assault moving to Minneapolis when arrested
  • Free pizza and a 75-foot statue of Elon Musk: The battle for the next $1.1 billion Tesla plant
  • A nasty knockout from a Muay Thai event shows how destructive a well-timed elbow to the temple can be
  • Santa Clara County Officials Work With State to Clarify Reopening Rollback Policy
  • OC officials approve proposal recommending schools reopen without mask, physical distancing requirements
  • Commentary: Will Tennessees Representatives Restore Representative Government to Tennessee?
  • Asian Stocks Drop on Recovery Concerns; Oil Slides: Markets Wrap
  • Union calls for Fairfax County police chiefs resignation
  • Invasive beetle that damages lilies found in St. Paul
  • Customs Agents Find 2 Species Of Invasive Moth Nests On Merchant Ships In Maryland
  • Asian Stocks Follow U.S. Shares Lower; Oil Slides: Markets Wrap
  • Asian markets struggle to digest coronavirus spike
  • Asian Stocks Look Set to Follow U.S. Shares Lower: Markets Wrap
  • Tech CEO resigns after video shows his racist rant towards Asian-American family at California restaurant
  • Arizona woman blames government officials for fathers COVID-19 death in obituary
  • Invasive Lily Leaf Beetle Found For 1st Time In Minnesota