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Jupiter and Saturn:

    SAN ANTONIO – Jupiter and Saturn -- they are planets you can see right now in the San Antonio night skies. If you don’t know how to spot them or don’t have a telescope to find them the San Antonio Astronomical Association is here to help. Every Wednesday, the association meets up for its free to the public event, “Astronomy in the Park.” The event is at Raymond Rimkus Park located on Evers Road in Leon Valley. Volunteers from the group will set out telescopes from about dusk until 10 p.m. Members of the group will do their best to answer questions about astronomy and the equipment used to view the skies.  Right now, it’s just Jupiter and Saturn...
    (Courtesy of Mike Lynch) The big highlight for August stargazing is the annual Perseid Meteor Shower. It’s one of the best of the year as our world crosses into a dense debris trail left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle that last passed through this part of the solar system back in 1992. The Perseids get going the first few days of August, but this year there’s a full moon at the same time. Most of the meteors — or “shooting stars” — will be lost in the glare of lunar light. The good news is that during the peak of the Perseids on the night of Aug. 11-12, there won’t be quite as much moonlight as we’ll have a last quarter...
    During these troubling times it’s so nice to be able to count on natural wonders. Stargazing and amateur astronomy certainly fit that bill, especially now with Jupiter and Saturn in the evening sky. (Courtesy Mike Lynch) These two giants of our solar system are really putting on a great show. From now until the end of the year they will be very close together in the sky. When you see them in the early evening southeast sky toward the end of evening twilight, Jupiter is the brighter of the two, rising ahead of Saturn. Right now Jupiter and Saturn are less than 10 degrees apart, about the width of your fist held at arm’s length. This is the closest they’ve...
    THIS Sunday is a great day for stargazing as you should be able to spot five planets and a crescent Moon. Venus will be easy to spot and Mars will be visible as a curved line. 2In this image Mars is the reddish star, Saturn is a small dot in the middle and the bright star on the right is JupiterCredit: Getty Images - Getty The rare celestial event will occur around two hours before sunrise. It will feature Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn and, of course, the Moon. All the planets should be bright enough to see with the naked eye. However, you might find it easier to see Mercury with some binoculars or a telescope. 2July is...
    Comet Neowise isn't the only cosmic phenomenon visible in the sky this weekend. On Sunday, July 19, skywatchers will be able to look up and spot five planets and the crescent moon — all without even using a telescope.  Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the moon, will be close enough and bright enough to spot with the naked eye on Sunday, NASA said. To see the show, you'll want to set an early alarm. You'll be able to spot the five planets plus the moon about 45 minutes before sunrise if you have a clear view of the horizon, according to astronomer Dr. Jeffrey Hunt. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Four of the...
    JUPITER and Saturn are the planets to watch this weekend as they'll form a bright triangle with the Full Moon. The Moon will also be coming into conjunction with both planets, meaning they'll all look bright and close together. 2 Conjunction is a term used by astronomers to explain when two celestial objects appear in a similar position in the sky when viewed from Earth. Scientists use a range of measurements to define when a planet can be considered as in conjunction, including the coordinate system of right ascension and declination. For example, if two astronomical objects have the same right accession measurement then they'll be considered as in conjunction with each other. You can see this for yourself on...
        July stargazing is always wonderful with the great constellations of summer climbing higher in the heavens. This July is even sweeter because Jupiter and Saturn, the giants of the solar system, are also on the rise. They’ll be side by side, like cat’s eyes glaring at you out of the darkness. Not far behind is Mars. All three will be available for the rest of the summer and autumn. If you ever wanted to purchase a telescope, now would be a great time to do it. After 10 p.m., look for the giants of our solar system rising together in the low southeast sky. You can’t miss them as they’ll be the brightest star-like objects in that part...
    As if Mercury moving backward isn’t enough, July is going to get even wilder for sky watchers. Three more big astronomical happenings are coming up next month — dueling meteor showers and a lunar eclipse, CBS station WUSA9 reported. The lunar eclipse starts at roughly 11 p.m. July 4. And more moon magic takes place July 5 when the orb passes extremely close to Jupiter and Saturn. The trio will be packed together so tightly that they may even appear as one to those looking through telescopes or binoculars. A week later, Jupiter and Saturn will blaze in the sky as they will “reach opposition, or the point in their orbits when they are closest to the Earth,” the...
    As if Mercury shifting backward isn’t sufficient, July goes to get even wilder for sky watchers. Three extra massive astronomical happenings are arising subsequent month — dueling meteor showers and a lunar eclipse, CBS station WUSA9 reported. The lunar eclipse begins at roughly 11 p.m. July 4. And extra moon magic takes place July 5 when the orb passes extraordinarily near Jupiter and Saturn. The trio shall be packed collectively so tightly that they might even seem as one to these wanting by telescopes or binoculars. Every week later, Jupiter and Saturn will blaze within the sky as they may “attain opposition, or the purpose of their orbits when they’re closest to the Earth,” the TV station famous. Maybe...
    A fleet of steam-powered robots could one day be used to explore the moons of Jupiter and Saturn by 'taking giant leaps across their frozen landscapes'. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory researchers are developing small football-sized spherical robots equipped with steam-powered thrusters for future exploration.  If they ever move beyond the initial concept stage, the robots would let scientists explore icy moons such as Europa and Enceladus orbiting Jupiter and Saturn.  These moons are thought to harbour salty subsurface oceans of liquid water, but very little is known about their surface - making it a potentially challenging terrain for a traditional moon rover, but easy for a leaping robotic ball powered by steam. The bots, called SPARROW, would run on steam...