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    The huge slabs of stone that make up the most iconic structures at Stonehenge came from about 25km away, according to chemical analysis. Since the 1500s, most Stonehenge scholars have assumed the 6- to 7-meter tall, 20-metric-ton sarsen stones came from nearby Marlborough Downs, and a recent study by University of Brighton archaeologist David Nash and his colleagues has now confirmed that. ARS TECHNICAThis story originally appeared on Ars Technica, a trusted source for technology news, tech policy analysis, reviews, and more. Ars is owned by WIRED's parent company, Condé Nast. Recent studies have traced Stonehenge’s bluestones to quarries in the Preseli Hills of western Wales, about 300km (200 miles) away. When another group of archaeologists studied the chemical isotope...
    Geoffrey of Monmouth laid out a theory about the origin of Stonehenge way back in 1136 in his account, titled “The History of the Kings of Britain.” Geoffrey said that Merlin, the wizard of the legend of King Arthur, used magic to move a ring of giant stones from Mount Killaraus in Ireland to a plateau in southern England, where Stonehenge is located. But it turns out that the story is much more ordinary — the stones came from about 15 miles away, according to new research. “Most of the hulking sandstone boulders — called sarsens — that make up the United Kingdom’s famous Stonehenge monument appear to share a common origin 25 kilometers away in West Woods, Wiltshire, according...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY WILL DUNHAM Scientists have solved an enduring mystery about Stonehenge, determining the place of origin of many of the megaliths that make up the famed monument in Wiltshire, England, thanks to a core sample that had been kept in the United States for decades. Geochemical testing indicates that 50 of Stonehenge’s 52 pale-gray sandstone megaliths, known as sarsens, share a common origin about 15 miles (25 km) away at a site called West Woods on the edge of Wiltshire’s Marlborough Downs, researchers said on Wednesday. The sarsens were erected at Stonehenge around 2500 BC. The largest stands 30 feet (9.1...
    Stonehenge, a Neolithic wonder in southern England, has vexed historians and archaeologists for centuries with its many mysteries: How was it built? What purpose did it serve? Where did its towering sandstone boulders come from? That last question may finally have an answer after a study published Wednesday found that most of the giant stones -- known as sarsens -- seem to share a common origin 16 miles away in West Woods, an area that teemed with prehistoric activity. The finding boosts the theory that the megaliths were brought to Stonehenge about the same time: around 2,500 BC, the monument's second phase of construction, which in turn could be a sign its builders were from a highly organized society. Get...
    The truth isn’t out there. Scientists say they’ve finally pinpointed the origin of the megaliths in the 5,000-year-old Stonehenge monument. Fifty of the 52 massive sandstone sarsens, as they’re called, used in the monument were quarried about 15 miles away from the West Woods in Wiltshire, researchers announced Wednesday after using Geochemical testing to trace back their origins. The sarsens were erected at Stonehenge in 2500 B.C., with the tallest reaching 30 feet high and the heaviest weighing 30 tons. Stonehenge’s smaller bluestones have a different origin story. Those stones have already been traced back to Pembrokeshire in Wales — about 150 miles away. But the source of the sarsens has until now eluded scientists. “The sarsen stones make up...
    A MAJOR Stonehenge puzzle has finally been solved after scientists located the origin of the monument's giant rocks. Modern scanning tech has traced the hulking sandstone boulders that make up Stonehenge to a site in Wiltshire. 6 Archaeologists think most of the larger stones – known as "sarsens" – were quarried in West Woods, just 15 miles away from Stonehenge. That's in contrast to the smaller "bluestones", which were taken from the Preseli Hills in Wales – around 180 miles away. It's been long suspected that the large sarsen stones were taken from the Marlborough Downs, west of London. And this new study confirms the exact area in the Downs where the stones were taken from. 6The Stonehenge sarsens are...
    Archaeologists have discovered a huge 1.2-mile-wide ring of Neolithic shafts near Stonehenge in southern England. Experts led by the U.K.’s University of Bradford report that the shafts are up to 32.8 feet wide and 16.4 feet deep. The structures have been carbon-dated to 2500 B.C. Up to 20 shafts have been identified, but archaeologists think that, originally, there may have been more than 30. STONEHENGE WAS LIKE ANCIENT 'LEGO,' EXPERTS SAY The shafts form a ring around the “super henge” at Durrington Walls, a much larger Neolithic monument than Stonehenge. Super henge is located about two miles from Stonehenge and is 15 times larger than its famous counterpart, according to LiveScience. Woodhenge, a prehistoric monument once composed of six rings of wooden...
    Stonehenge has long been one of history’s great mysteries — and the world heritage site has just revealed yet another layer to its story. Archaeologists have discovered a network of underground shafts which span 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) near Stonehenge, presumed to have been built by the same Neolithic peoples who erected Stonehenge 4,500 years ago. It is believed that they served as guideposts leading to Durrington Walls, another one of Britain’s henge monuments, located 1.9 miles northeast of Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. “This is an unprecedented find of major significance within the UK,” said University of Bradford’s Vincent Gaffney, lead researcher on the Stonehenge Hidden Landscape project. He told The Guardian, “Key researchers on Stonehenge and its landscape have...
    Stonehenge has long been one of history’s great mysteries — and the world heritage site has just revealed yet another layer to its story. Archaeologists have discovered a network of underground shafts which span 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) near Stonehenge, presumed to have been built by the same Neolithic peoples who erected Stonehenge 4,500 years ago. It is believed that they served as guideposts leading to Durrington Walls, another one of Britain’s henge monuments, located 1.9 miles northeast of Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. “This is an unprecedented find of major significance within the UK,” said University of Bradford’s Vincent Gaffney, lead researcher on the Stonehenge Hidden Landscape project. He told The Guardian, “Key researchers on Stonehenge and its landscape have...
    LONDON (AP) — Archaeologists said Monday that they have discovered a major prehistoric monument under the earth near Stonehenge that could shed new light on the origins of the mystical stone circle in southwestern England. Experts from a group of British universities led by the University of Bradford say the site consists of at least 20 huge shafts, more than 10 meters (32 feet) in diameter and 5 meters (16 feet) deep, forming a circle more than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter. The new find is at Durrington Walls, the site of a Neolithic village about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) from Stonehenge, Researchers say the shafts appear to have been dug around 4,500 years ago, and could...