2020-08-05@07:41:31 GMT
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    Iowa Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds is not budging against schools that defy her mandate to open for in-person instruction at least 50% of the time, according to the Des Moines Register. At least two school districts in Iowa have decided not to abide by Reynolds' mandate, and Reynolds made it clear Tuesday that schools that aren't open for in-person classes at least half the time won't have that excess online instruction counted toward the state-mandated number of instructional hours and days. "Schools that choose not to return to school for at least 50% in-person instruction are not defying me, they are defying the law," Reynolds said during a press conference. "If schools move to primarily remote learning without approval,...
    Reynolds' statement came one day after two school boards in the state voted to defy her order. The Urbandale school board had already received permission from the state on July 13 to start the year with online-only classes. But because that permission was set to expire, the board asked for a waiver extension based on the advice of the local health department, as the district straddles two counties — Polk and Dallas — that have positive test rates of 8% and 7.1%, respectively. The state denied the waiver on Monday. The board made the original request "due to high community spread of the virus and in consideration of information and guidance provided by local public health officials," Steve Bass, district...
    Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) took a hard stance Tuesday against any schools planning to defy the state’s requirement for at least 50 percent in-person learning, warning that unapproved remote learning time will not count toward instructional hours.  “I want to be very clear, schools that choose not to return to school or at least 50 percent in-person instruction are not defying me, they're defying the law,” Reynolds said Tuesday at a press conference as districts nationwide struggle with plans to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.  She added that an Iowa school’s move to “primarily remote learning” without state approval will not have those days count toward instructional time.  On Monday, a pair of districts in the state said they...
    Kellyanne Conway's teenage daughter Claudia branded Donald Trump a 'f****** idiot' on Twitter for stating that schools should be opened amid the coronavirus pandemic.  The 15-year-old yesterday retweeted a post from Trump which read: 'Cases up because of BIG Testing! Much of our Country is doing very well. Open the Schools!'  She added the caption: 'You're a f****** idiot'.  Trump has frequently blamed America's high number of coronavirus cases - upwards of 4.7 million making it the worst-hit country in the world - on increased testing figures.  Just hours later she told the President to 'please shut up' after he tweeted: 'OPEN THE SCHOOLS!!!' Kellyanne Conway's teenage daughter Claudia branded Donald Trump a 'f****** idiot' in another Twitter rant...
    Sabrina Lira Garcia is proud to work as a clinical assistant in the COVID-19 ward of a Los Angeles hospital, but sometimes she wishes she could just stay home with her infant son until the pandemic is over. But pulling her child from day care was not an option for Lira Garcia. She can’t put her career on hold. Her husband was born in Mexico and is undocumented, and the family pays monthly legal fees to help him get residency papers. If he were ever deported, she’d have to support 9-month-old Jeremiah by herself. “I couldn’t afford to just stay home,” she said. Lira Garcia and thousands of other essential workers have had no choice but to put their...
    By: KDKA-TV Staff HARRISBURG, Pa. (KDKA) — Governor Tom Wolf suggested school districts that choose to offer online-only classes should cancel their fall sports. A number of local districts, including Woodland Hills and Pittsburgh Public Schools, have already decided to start the year remotely. Wolf said his administration plans to release more guidance for school sports and fans in a few days. “What happens in the school should be consistent with what happens in the playing field,” Wolf said on Monday. “If the school is going to be completely virtual, it’s hard to justify in-person contact sports played in the fall.” Last week, the WPIAL announced it is pushing back the start dates of fall sports, while the PIAA said...
    In working through what to say to my children about school in the fall, I remember that butterflies’ hearts are in their wings—and how I came to know this a decade ago. My daughter’s hand curled up in a fist in my hand just as we reached the school’s front door. A moment ago, our clasped hands swung lightly between us. We chatted easily about the day ahead as we navigated the thicket of strollers, and we were just a few steps from her official start as a public-school student when she tensed. I followed her gaze and saw the long mesh basket hanging from a hook in the corner. Inside, I could make out a clutch of butterflies darting...
    President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos are endangering the health and lives of millions of children and their families by demanding schools around the country reopen for in-person classes as the coronavirus pandemic continues. In addition, Trump and DeVos are using the pandemic as an excuse to intensify their war on public schools, public school teachers and teacher unions. They want the American people to believe that public schools do a lousy job and that teacher unions are only interested in fattening teachers’ paychecks and protecting incompetents. The president and education secretary seem to believe the only way students can get a good education is to abandon public schools and enroll in charters or private schools. TRUMP WANTS $105B...
    This story is a reporting partnership between WBEZ Chicago public radio and Chalkbeat Chicago. CHICAGO — In the midst of a heated debate last year about whether police officers should work in Chicago’s public schools, district leaders agreed to pay up to the full salary and benefits of staff assigned to the $33 million program, even though they are police department employees. Chalkbeat Chicago and WBEZ have learned that the school district agreed to pay $152,000 per police officer and $172,000 per sergeant on a 12-month contract. School is in session for 10 months, and officers have other police department duties during the summer months and other times they are not in schools. On Wednesday, in response to months of reporters’ questions...
    President Donald Trump has been railing nonstop against mail-in voting, claiming that it is a major recipe for voter fraud — although he often adds that absentee voting is OK because it’s something different. But when Michael Steele, former chairman of the Republican National Committee, appeared on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” on July 31, he stressed that Trump is talking nonsense because mail-in voting and absentee voting are the same thing. Steele told “Morning Joe” hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, “Mail-in balloting, mail-in voting is legitimate. It is done in at least five states. Every state has some form of it. You know it as absentee balloting. Yesterday, the president was like, ‘I love absentee balloting, but this vote by...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) — One day after sending a letter saying that health authorities can’t issue ‘blanket orders’ closing schools because of the COVID-19 pandemic, on Wednesday Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton released a statement clarifying that there is no statewide shutdown order in effect. In the legally nonbinding letter sent Tuesday Paxton said, “While local health authorities may possess some authority to close schools in limited circumstances, they may not issue blanket orders closing all schools on a purely preventative basis. That decision rightfully remains with school system leaders.” View this document on Scribd In the Wednesday statement Paxton said, “While we all recognize the need for diligence, caution, and preparation ahead of the upcoming school year, only...
    At 4 a.m. on March 13, the first teacher strike in St. Paul in more than 70 years ended. With little rest, the district negotiations team who had spent days in intense, closed negotiations — after spending weeks and months in public negotiations — went right back to work continuing to plan for an anticipated closure of Minnesota schools due to COVID 19. This planning started weeks before, running concurrently with both negotiations and the daily operation of the state’s second largest school district. When schools were closed the following week, we heard the phrase, “unprecedented times” a lot. We knew things would never be the same; we just didn’t know how different they would be. Once schools were closed,...
    At four in the morning on March 13, the first teacher strike in St. Paul in over 70 years ended. With little rest, the district negotiations team who had spent days in intense, closed negotiations, after spending weeks and months in public negotiations, went right back to work continuing to plan for an anticipated closure of Minnesota schools due to COVID 19. This planning had started weeks before, running concurrently with both negotiations and the daily operation of the state’s second-largest school district. When schools were closed the following week, we heard the phrase, “unprecedented times” a lot. We knew things would never be the same, we just didn’t how different they would be. Once schools were closed, everyone who...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed Tennessee Director the American Federation for Children Shaka Mitchell to the show. During the third hour, Mitchell weighed in on the current status of Metro government’s decision to keep kids out of school for the fall. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmakers line by our good friend Shaka Mitchell who is the Tennessee state director for the American Federation for Children. Shaka welcome. Mitchell: Hey good morning. Thanks for having me on again. Leahy: The big issue now...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Gov. Tim Walz will announce tomorrow if Minnesota schools can safely reopen in the fall because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The decision comes as the President is threatening to withhold classroom funding in schools that don’t reopen. In Minnesota, that’s hundreds of millions of dollars. The state spends $13 billion a year on public schools; 95% of it comes from Minnesota taxpayers. However, the federal government funds Minnesota school programs too. In 2019, it provided a total of $833 million. President Trump, however, is threatening to withhold funding from schools that don’t reopen this fall. He’s made several tweets and public comments, like when he said on July 6 that “SCHOOLS MUST OPEN IN THE FALL!!!”or on July 8...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) — One day after sending a letter saying that health authorities can’t issue ‘blanket orders’ closing schools because of the COVID-19 pandemic, on Wednesday Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton released a statement clarifying that there is no statewide shutdown order in effect. In the legally nonbinding letter sent Tuesday Paxton said, “While local health authorities may possess some authority to close schools in limited circumstances, they may not issue blanket orders closing all schools on a purely preventative basis. That decision rightfully remains with school system leaders.” In the Wednesday statement Paxton said, “While we all recognize the need for diligence, caution, and preparation ahead of the upcoming school year, only the elected local school authorities have...
    Some of the nation’s leading teachers unions are backing a “safe schools” plan that outlines what teachers and administrators need for students to return to classrooms either amid or immediately following the coronavirus pandemic — but few of the topline demands have much to do with COVID-19. In a document labeled “demands,” the group, under the banner of the Journeys for Justice Alliance, claims that no return to classrooms will be truly “healthy” until those same schools are also “equitable.” And to that end, they have a list of eight demands that outline conditions under which union teachers may agree to return to in-classroom instruction. At least two of the demands are, in fact, related to the novel coronavirus, with...
    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is proposing a ban on the military using popular online gaming platforms to recruit new enlistees. The 30-year-old New York Democrat is asking the House Rules Committee to adopt on Tuesday new restrictions that end the Pentagon’s digital job ads. Ocasio-Cortez, known by her initials AOC, told The New York Times her proposal would prohibit use of funds by “the Armed Forces to maintain a presence on Twitch.tv or any video game, esports, or livestreaming platform.” “Whether through recruitment stations in their lunchrooms, or now through e-sports teams, children in low-income communities are persistently targeted for enlistment,” AOC said. “In many public high schools where military recruiters have a daily presence, there is not even a counselor,”...
    OUTSPOKEN Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton has sparked fury after he called slavery a “necessary evil upon which the union was built”. The Republican, 43, made the controversial remarks in an interview with the Arkansas Democrat Gazette on Sunday promoting a new bill that would defund schools that taught the New York Times’ 1619 Project about slavery in the US. 5Republican Senator Tom Cotton received a backlash over his comments about slaveryCredit: Getty Images - Getty 5The Arkansas Senator defended his views on TwitterCredit: Twitter Mr Cotton argued that slavery was a key piece of US history, saying: “As the founding fathers said, it was the necessary evil upon which the union was built, but the union was built in a...
    Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton sparked outrage by calling the enslavement of millions of African people in the early years of the United States a 'necessary evil'.   Cotton, an outspoken Republican, made the jarring remark in an interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette on Sunday as he promoted a new bill that would defund schools that teach the New York Times' controversial 1619 Project about slavery in the US.   The senator argued that slavery is a critical piece of American history, saying: 'As the founding fathers said, it was the necessary evil upon which the union was built, but the union was built in a way, as Lincoln said, to put slavery on the course to its ultimate extinction.' Cotton later defended his...
    Tom Cotton, a Republican U.S. Senator representing Arkansas, has filed a bill that would withhold federal funding to any schools that teach “The 1619 Project,” a Pulitzer-prize winning piece of in-depth journalism from The New York Times published in 2019 that explores the United States’s legacy of slavery. Cotton’s so-called Saving American History Act of 2020 would punish schools that teach lessons based on “The 1619 Project” by making them ineligible for federal professional development grants. “The New York Times’s 1619 Project is a racially divisive, revisionist account of history that denies the noble principles of freedom and equality on which our nation was founded,” Cotton wrote. “Not a single cent of federal funding should go to indoctrinate young Americans with this left-wing garbage.”...
    Sen. Susan Collins, the Republican from Maine who is in the top 10 of seniority in her party, says she’s really “hopeful” that maybe the coronavirus relief package Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to negotiate among his squabbling conference will have critical assistance for state and local governments. It doesn’t right now, which tells you just about how much sway Susan Collins has in her party. Back in May, Collins actually sponsored a bill to spend $500 billion in direct aid to state and local governments. Clearly that had a big impact on McConnell. There’s none in the package he floated this week, just money for reopening schools. Just to put a fine point on this, that’s $70 billion to K-12 schools—half of which has to...
    Sen. Susan Collins, the Republican from Maine who is in the top 10 of seniority in her party, says she’s really "hopeful" that maybe the coronavirus relief package Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to negotiate among his squabbling conference will have critical assistance for state and local governments. It doesn't right now, which tells you just about how much sway Susan Collins has in her party. Back in May, Collins actually sponsored a bill to spend $500 billion in direct aid to state and local governments. Clearly that had a big impact on McConnell. There's none in the package he floated this week, just money for reopening schools. Just to put a fine point on this, that’s $70 billion to...
    Arkansas Republican Senator Tom Cotton has introduced a bill that would cut federal funding for any school district that teaches the 1619 project, a major interactive initiative from the New York Times that examines the history of slavery in the United States. As Forbes noted, Cotton introduced the bill this week aiming to pull federal funds for any K-12 school district that makes the project part of its curriculum. As the report noted, a number of conservatives have criticized the project and some historians have disputed its historic accuracy. The proposal calls on the secretaries of Education, Health and Human Services and Agriculture to shave funding depending on the cost to implement the project into curriculum. The report noted that...
    Barron Trump's private Maryland school will not fully reopen despite President Trump's insistence that students are back in the classrooms this fall - even threatening public schools with reduced federal funding if they stay closed.  St. Andrew's Episcopal School put out an update this week saying that the school will keep distance learning in place or open using a hybrid model, with students learning both on and off campus.  If the school decides to go with a hybrid model, then students in grades seven through 12 will be 'rotating between on-campus and distance learning on a weekly basis.'  Barron Trump (right) won't have the option to attend school full-time in the fall, as his private Maryland school will either...
    Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., on Thursday introduced legislation attacking the New York Times’s “1619 Project” — and calling for federal defunding of schools that incorporate its curriculum. In a statement, Cotton called the project “racially divisive,” the National Review reported. “Not a single cent of federal funding should go to indoctrinate young Americans with this left-wing garbage,” he said in the statement. The 1619 Project, named after the year when colonists first brought slaves to the United States, emphasizes the importance of slavery in the country’s earliest years, the National Review noted. But historians have criticized the project for “factual errors” and a ” displacement of historical understanding by ideology.” The National Review said one example is the assertion by the...
    Like many conservatives, Cotton is unhappy with the Times' project, which is an ongoing multimedia look at the role slavery has played in the history of what is now the United States. The project, conceived as a wide-ranging examination of the 400 years since the arrival of the first enslaved African people in Virginia, was created mostly by Black contributors. While some historians have disputed parts of the project, its creator, Nikole Hannah-Jones was awarded the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for commentary for the project. The board praised her "sweeping, provocative and personal essay for the ground-breaking 1619 Project, which seeks to place the enslavement of Africans at the center of America's story, prompting public conversation about the nation's founding and...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City  The New York state legislature voted Wednesday to pause the use of facial recognition technology in schools until 2022.  Both the state Senate and Assembly passed the bill yesterday a month after the New York Civil Liberty Union filed a lawsuit against the New York State Department of Education for violating student data protection laws by approving the use of facial recognition technology at Lockport City Schools in January.  The facial recognition system used by Lockport City Schools continuously scanned the faces of students as young as five years old to see if they matched with any photos on the school’s...
    Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton introduced legislation Thursday which would prohibit the use of federal funding from going towards the teaching of The New York Times’ “1619 Project.” The Saving American History Act of 2020 would also bar federal professional-development grants from schools that teach curriculums related to the “1619 Project.” (RELATED: New York Times Writer Claims Property Destruction Is ‘Not Violence’) “The New York Times’s 1619 Project is a racially divisive, revisionist account of history that denies the noble principles of freedom and equality on which our nation was founded. Not a single cent of federal funding should go to indoctrinate young Americans with this left-wing garbage,” Cotton said in a press release. Reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones attends The 75th Annual...
    Bill Gates has warned that any vaccine against coronavirus could take several doses to be effective, as he described 'serious mistakes' made by the Trump administration and said some schools may not be back to normal until the fall of 2021. The Microsoft founder, who now directs much of his time and energy to his global health foundation, said that the closure of schools was, after deaths, the 'biggest cost' of the pandemic. And, in an interview with Norah O'Donnell on CBS News, aired on Wednesday night, the Seattle-based billionaire was critical of Donald Trump's handling of the crisis. 'Some of the policies were a mistake,' said Gates.  Bill Gates appeared on CBS News on Wednesday evening to discuss...
    The NAACP is suing Education Secretary Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosVirginia's largest school district reverses on reopening to in-person classes A 'law and order' campaign does not meet the moment Here's your state's plan for reopening schools MORE over a pending rule change to CARES Act funding that would require the country's public school districts to give private schools more relief aid provided by the multi-trillion dollar coronavirus stimulus package. The complaint, which was filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, alleges that DeVos illegally changed the parameters under which the $13.2 billion Congress allocated for the nation's schools is distributed. The money is part of a larger fund known as the Education Stabilization Fund that was created when President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than a...
    The United States needs to lower the COVID-19 transmission rate in order to reopen schools, the Surgeon General said Tuesday.  Speaking with CBS Jerome Adams said: 'What I want people to know is the biggest determinant of whether or not we can go back to school actually has little to nothing to do with the actual schools – it's your background transmission rate.' His warning comes as President Donald Trump pushes for schools to reopen. Statistics show that as of Monday just 12 US states had a transmission rate - the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infects - below 1.0. The remaining states show values over 1.0 which means we should expect more cases there. And Adams warned: 'It's why we've...
    WALSH: Public School Teachers Are Now Insisting That Public Schools Are Inessential. As A Homeschool Parent, I Agree.
    Republicans are expected to unveil their plan to steer the United States out of the coronavirus pandemic - a $1 trillion plan with funds for schools, small businesses and the jobless.  Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Senate, is likely to unveil his proposals in the coming days, ahead of the the House's scheduled break on July 31, and the Senate recess beginning August 7. Precise figures for the $1 trillion bill are still being decided, but the plan will have a heavy emphasis on education, Axios reported, giving schools increased funds to help prepare for fall re-openings.  Mitch McConnell, Republican leader, is to set out his $1 trillion proposal this week Unemployment benefits, currently an additional $600 a week, will be...
    I've seen what's going on with the whole "it's too dangerous to open up the schools" thing before. His name was Brett Kavanaugh. The president that was going to drain the swamp ended up nominating the perfect legal swamp squish, much to the early chagrin of the conservative base that held their nose to vote for Donald Trump. You'd think that the schadenfreude might have been enough for the progressive left. They had to know how Pyrrhic the Republicans' victory truly was and that yet another Roberts or Kennedy had been secured to undermine the future of conservative legal fortunes for decades to come. But it wasn't enough. Not even close. Order 66 was issued, and all hell broke...
    Donald Trump asserted Sunday morning that he will 'eventually' get it right on coronavirus after he claimed on several occasions that the threat will just 'disappear' one day. 'I'll be right eventually. I will be right eventually. You know I said, 'It's going to disappear.' I'll say it again,' the president told Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace in an hour-long interview. 'It's going to disappear and I'll be right,' he continued. Wallace pushed back: 'But does that – does that discredit you?' 'I don't think so,' Trump countered. 'You know why? Because I've been right probably more than anybody else.' 'I'll be right eventually,' Donald Trump asserted Sunday morning when talking about his claims that the coronavirus threat...
    This is not the Secretary of Education parents are looking for. I don’t last too long in “closed” Facebook groups on community/local issues because usually the admins prohibit political discussion in these forums, on the sensible assumption that these would otherwise degenerate into vitriolic bloodbaths, permanently hampering or killing all discussion. I have nothing but awe and admiration for my friends who manage to navigate such forums with grace and equanimity, but I’ve simply accepted that it would probably be best if I didn’t even try to do that at this point.  Having said that, I’ve managed to lurk around one recently, involving a group of suburban parents—Republicans and Democrats—trying to intelligently address the subject of our township’s plans to open...
    Savannah Rychcik July 17, 2020 0 Comments White House adviser Kellyanne Conway is leaving it up to President Donald Trump and first Lady Melania Trump to decide whether their son Barron should go back to school amid the coronavirus pandemic. A reporter asked Conway if the first couple have decided whether they will send Barron back to school. Conway explained it is a decision for his parents to make. “Oh, that’s a personal decision. I don’t know what Barron’s school has decided and I certainly don’t know what the first couple has decided with respect to their teenage son who I believe is entering high school this year,” Conway said.Check out her comments below: Question: "Have [President Trump] and the First Lady...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With about one month left until the start of the new school year, some parents are taking extreme measures to avoid remote learning while others are getting creative with childcare. Some parents have decided to make the switch from public to private schools, or even move to another state, so their children can return to campus for school this fall. (Credit: CBSLA) Elena Guerassimova, who works full time at a dental office, said she struggled to help her two sons keep up with their school work after schools shut down in March. “I would come home at 6:30, and that’s when whatever homework they didn’t do, I have to either explain or correct and do one...
    I don’t last too long in “closed Facebook groups” on community/local issues because usually the admins prohibit political discussion in these forums, on the sensible assumption that these would otherwise degenerate into vitriolic bloodbaths, permanently hampering or killing all discussion. I have nothing but awe and admiration for my friends who manage to navigate such forums with grace and equanimity, but I’ve simply accepted that it would probably be best if I didn’t even try to do that at this point. Having said that, I’ve managed to lurk around one recently, involving a group of suburban parents—Republicans and Democrats–trying to intelligently address the subject of our township’s plans to open up our public schools in six weeks. After a while...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) — The Texas Education Agency will reportedly allow public health officials to keep schools closed for in-person instruction this fall due to the coronavirus pandemic without the campuses risking losing state funding. It was just last week when the agency issued an order requiring schools to open for in-person instruction five days a week for all students and parents who want it. The order gave districts a transition period of three weeks to hold classes virtually and get their safety plans in place before allowing students back on campuses. After the initial three-week transition, any district that continued with an entirely virtual curriculum would risk losing funding. In a turnabout on Wednesday a spokesperson with the TEA...
    Recommendations approved by the Orange County Board of Education to welcome students back to campuses without increased social distancing in classrooms or the mandatory use of masks were met with a fierce backlash from educators and parents Tuesday, highlighting the larger divide in the county over the use of face coverings and other coronavirus protections. How to reopen schools has become a major political battle, with President Trump pushing educators to get kids back into the classroom despite a surge of new COVID-19 cases and concerns that in-person instruction is simply not safe. Los Angeles, San Diego and a growing number of other communities in California are putting off reopening plans, citing the coronavirus spike and a lack of testing...
    A federal judge scheduled arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit challenging a new Trump administration policy requiring international students to transfer schools or leave the country if their colleges hold classes entirely online this fall because of the coronavirus pandemic. The suit is being brought by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which argue that the policy was created unlawfully and that it contradicts previous guidance from federal immigration officials. The colleges are asking the court to block the rule at least temporarily. Under the policy, international students in the U.S. would be forbidden from taking all of their courses online this fall. New visas would not be issued to students at schools planning to provide all classes online,...
    As the number of new coronavirus infections continues to surge in the Sun Belt this summer, many devotees of President Donald Trump are accusing expert immunologist Dr. Anthony Fauci and officials for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of being alarmists. Four former CDC directors (Tom Frieden, Jeffrey Koplan, David Satcher and Richard Besser) discuss the efforts of Trump allies to “undermine” the CDC in a July 14 op-ed for the Washington Post. Frieden served as CDC director from 2009 to 2017, while Koplan held that position from 1998 to 2002 and Satcher did so from 1993 to 1998. Besser was acting director of the CDC in 2009 during the H1N1 crisis. “As America begins the formidable task of...
    Researchers at the University of Houston claimed to have designed a special air filter that can trap the novel coronavirus and blast it with heat to kill the disease on contact. Dr. Zhifeng Ren, director of the Texas Center of Superconductivity at UH, is the brains behind the project, the Houston Chronicle reported. Ren worked with Medistar CEO Monzer Hourani to bring about a “unique design” made from heated nickel foam, which was detailed in a paper published by Materials Today Physics. Researchers reportedly conducted tests at Galveston National Laboratory and found that 99.8 percent of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 was killed “instantly,” after a single pass through the filter. The process does, however, require the foam...
    JERUSALEM—Israel’s unchecked resurgence of COVID-19 was propelled by the abrupt May 17 decision to reopen all schools, medical and public health officials have told The Daily Beast.“We know Israelis have terrible discipline, but now, it’s the leadership. ”— Galia Rahav, Sheba Medical Center in Tel AvivThe assessment of Israel’s trajectory has direct bearing on the heated debate currently underway in the United States between the Trump White House, which is demanding a nationwide reopening of schools, and federal health authorities, which caution it could put the wider population at risk. On Sunday, for instance, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday, “There’s nothing in the data that suggests that kids being in school is in...
    President Donald Trump answers questions from reporters during a roundtable with people positively impacted by law enforcement on July 13. Evan Vucci/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.Late last week, as part of his ongoing effort to pressure schools into reopening this fall during the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump threatened the tax-exempt status afforded to schools throughout the country, adding that “too many Schools and Universities are about Radical Left Indoctrination, not Education.” As a legal matter, law professors and a former US Education Department attorney tell Mother Jones, Trump’s threat is a nonstarter on First Amendment grounds, but that doesn’t mean it’s harmless. “At a practical level, higher education and...
    Los Angeles County public health officials have announced new guidelines for school districts that choose to resume in-person learning in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic, warning that things will look very different on campuses when students and teachers return. Officials said Monday that children in L.A. County’s 80 school districts would be required to wear face coverings, with such exceptions as during nap time, and the use of hand sanitizer will be encouraged, especially among younger students. Team sports that don’t allow for physical distancing will not be permitted. “I want to assure you that we are committed to working closely with the school districts,” Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said. The news comes on the...
    Chuck Woolery on March 19, 2015 in Beverly Hills, California.Jason LaVeris | FilmMagic | Getty Images President Donald Trump retweeted a post by game show host Chuck Woolery that baselessly claimed "everyone is lying" about the coronavirus pandemic in a possible effort to thwart Trump's re-election chances this fall by harming the economy. The conservative Woolery, who hosted shows such as "Love Connection," wrote on Sunday evening, "The most outrageous lies are the ones about Covid 19." "Everyone is lying. The CDC [federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention], Media, Democrats, our Doctors, not all but most, that we are told to trust," Woolery wrote. "I think it's all about the election and keeping the economy from coming back, which...
    The formula that will be used to reopen schools across New York State has been released. Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement at a news briefing on Monday, July 13 in Manhattan. Schools can reopen if region is in Phase 4 and daily infection rate is five percent or lower over 14-day average. But if the regional infection rate is greater than nine percent using a seven-day average after Saturday, Aug. 1, schools will then have to close. The determination for school reopenings will be determined the week of Aug. 1-7 Specifics on reopenings are being left to the state's 700 school districts in accordance with state guidelines. The New York State Department of Health released the guidelines for reopening...
    The formula that will be used to reopen schools across New York State has been released. Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement at a news briefing on Monday, July 13 in Manhattan. Schools can reopen if region is in Phase 4 and daily infection rate is five percent or lower over 14-day average. But if the regional infection rate is greater than nine percent using a seven-day average after Saturday, Aug. 1, schools will then have to close. The determination for school reopenings will be determined the week of Aug. 1-7 Specifics on reopenings are being left to the state's 700 school districts in accordance with state guidelines. The New York State Department of Health released the guidelines for reopening...
    (CBS Miami)– After Monday’s report of new coronavirus numbers, there are now over 269,000 cases of coronavirus in the state of Florida and over 64,000 in Miami-Dade County. Florida Senator Marco Rubio addressed the state’s battle with COVID-19 and several other topics on Monday morning in an interview with CNBC’s Squawk Box. Senator Rubio was also specifically asked if he thinks Disney should close in Orlando due to the record surge in the state. “I don’t think there’s any evidence that any of the businesses we are talking about closing are in any way driving the infection surge,” said Senator Rubio. “I think the bottom line is what’s happening is people are going out and particularly younger people and they’re getting...
    The 1918 flu hammered this Arizona mining town. Now a new scourge looms Tax Day deals and freebies are almost non-existent after tax deadline moved to July due to COVID-19 Trump Shares Chuck Woolery Tweet That CDC Is Lying About COVID-19 © TheWrap President Donald Trump shared a tweet from former game show host Chuck Woolery that said "everyone is lying" about the coronavirus early Monday morning — including his administration's own Centers for Disease Control. "The most outrageous lies are the ones about Covid 19. Everyone is lying. The CDC, Media, Democrats, our Doctors, not all but most ,that we are told to trust. I think it's all about the election and keeping the economy from coming back,...
    Here’s what we know about whether it’s safe or practical to send millions of American kids and teenagers back to school for the fall term, which in some districts begins in just over a month: Nothing. Parents, teachers, school administrators and elected officials are — I mean, pick your cliché: We’re lost. (I’m a public school parent in New York City, so I’ll go with the first-person plural.) We’re wandering in the desert without a map as darkness falls, or perhaps trying to find an invisible needle in a burning haystack, which is threatening to set the entire barn on fire. As Robin Cogan, a school nurse in Camden, New Jersey, told the New York Times: “It feels like we’re playing Russian...
    The leader of one of the largest teachers’ unions in the U.S. accused President Donald Trump over the weekend of “trying to bury” federal guidelines warning that fully reopening schools and universities in the fall poses a high risk of spreading Covid-19 and endangering the health of students, faculty, and parents. A 69-page packet (pdf) of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention materials obtained by the New York Times and labeled “For Internal Use Only” cautions that the “more people a student or staff member interacts with, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of Covid-19 spread.” Last week, Trump complained on Twitter that non-binding school reopening guidelines offered by the CDC—which recommends that students maintain six feet of distance from each other and...
    South Africa reimposes liquor ban amid coronavirus surge to free up hospital space Former tennis player Mardy Fish wins celebrity golf title Chris Wallace Debunks Betsy DeVos Authority to Pull Funding From Schools That Dont Reopen © TheWrap Betsy DeVos Chris Wallace grilled education secretary Betsy DeVos on "Fox News Sunday," questioning her authority to pull funding from schools that refuse to reopen next month in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, telling her, "You can't do that." "American investment is a promise to students and their families," DeVos said. "If schools aren't going to reopen and fulfill that promise, they shouldn't get the funds. Then give it to the families to decide to go to a school that is...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Sen. Chuck Schumer is pushing for more federal funding to ensure schools can reopen safely. “For the PPE, for the barriers, for the cleaning materials, they need the dollars. They don’t have it on their own. We need to get it to them ASAP,” Schumer said Sunday. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Resources, Hotlines, Unemployment & Covering Bills Remote Learning Tools For Parents Teaching At Home Ask Dr. Max Your Health Questions How Make Your Own DIY Face Mask How To Safely Remove Disposable Gloves Tips For Parents To Help Kids Cope Chopper 2 Over Empty NYC Streets, Landmarks Complete Coronavirus Coverage The proposal, developed with Washington Sen. Patty Murray, is known as the Coronavirus Child Care...
    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said federal aid should go to families, not schools, if districts refuse to open this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic. DeVos has expressed strong support for a fall reopening of schools with the backing of President Trump and further explained her reasoning in an interview on Sunday. "Look, American investment in education is a promise to students and their families," DeVos told Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace. "If schools aren't going to reopen and not fulfill that promise, they shouldn't get the funds. Then give it to the families to decide to go to a school that is going to meet that promise." "It's a promise to the American people. Let's follow through...
    Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos squirmed during her Sunday morning media tour when asked about the Trump administration’s threat to yank funding from schools that don’t fully reopen amidst the coronavirus pandemic. In an interview with CNN’s Dana Bash that went on for more than 20 minutes, DeVos couldn’t guarantee people wouldn’t get sick from reopening schools, nor could she articulate a comprehensive plan to facilitate a reopening according to CDC guidelines. Toward the end of the showdown, Bash switched gears to ask DeVos about how she and Trump both suggested that federal funds would be withheld from schools that don’t open up. Bash pointed out to DeVos that “you don’t have a lot of authority” on defunding...
    David Edwards July 12, 2020 3:40PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Raw Story Fox News host Chris Wallace on Sunday challenged Trump administration Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over a threat to cut off funding for schools that do not agree to gathering students together during the coronavirus pandemic. "Both you and the president have threatened to cut off funding for schools systems that don't open fully in the fall," Wallace explained during an interview with DeVos. "Are you and the president unilaterally going to cut off funding that's been approved by Congress — and most of the money goes to disadvantaged students or students with disabilities?" : Wallace continued: "And secondly, isn't cutting off funding exactly the wrong...
    Fox News host Chris Wallace challenged Trump administration Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on a threat to cut off funding for schools that don’t return to in-school learning amid the coronavirus pandemic on this week’s broadcast of “Fox News Sunday.” Wallace said, “Both you and the president have threatened to cut off funding for school systems that don’t open fully in the fall. ” He continued, “One, under what authority are you and the president unilaterally going to cut off funding. Funding that’s been approved by Congress — and most of the money goes to disadvantaged students or students with disabilities? And secondly, isn’t cutting off funding exactly the wrong answer? Don’t you want to spend more money to make schools...
    Fox News’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceDC delegate: Congress took up police reform due to 'impatience in the streets' Activist: Stop vilifying protesters and try to understand why they are fighting Ex-CDC director: 'No doubt' coronavirus 'has the upper hand' MORE pressed Secretary of Education Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosSunday shows preview: Coronavirus poses questions about school safety; Trump commutes Roger Stone sentence Democrats seek to tie GOP candidates to Trump, DeVos DeVos urges school districts to 'think creatively' about reopening amid coronavirus MORE on Sunday on her and President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal...
    If Minnesota’s public schools are to reopen after Labor Day for the first time in nearly six months, school leaders must put in place a long list of precautions to prevent further spread of the coronavirus. The rest of us have work to do, too, experts say, but our task is familiar and much simpler: Wash your hands, keep your distance from others and wear a face covering when out in public. “I know we’re sort of depressed and lonely, but if we could do that so kids can get back to school, I think that would be a worthy sacrifice,” said M. Kumi Smith, an assistant professor in epidemiology and community health at the University of Minnesota. There’s persuasive...
    Researchers at the University of Houston claimed to have designed a special air filter that can trap the novel coronavirus and blast it with heat to kill the disease on contact. Dr. Zhifeng Ren, director of the Texas Center of Superconductivity at UH, is the brains behind the project, the Houston Chronicle reported. Ren worked with Medistar CEO Monzer Hourani to bring about a "unique design" made from heated nickel foam, which was detailed in a paper published by Materials Today Physics. Researchers reportedly conducted tests at Galveston National Laboratory and found that 99.8 percent of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 was killed "instantly," after a single pass through the filter. The process does, however, require the foam to be heated at 392 degrees Fahrenheit....
    White House economic adviser Larry KudlowLawrence (Larry) Alan KudlowMORE told reporters on Friday that it was important for schools to reopen in the fall despite risks from the novel coronavirus, saying safely bringing students back is "not that hard." "The President has been very vocal about going back to school. And I would add to that, as I said all these fancy colleges and universities, of which I went to one," Kudlow told reporters. "They should get with the drill, you know? Put the guys in classrooms and let them learn. Or, God knows what they're teaching, but whatever. I'll put it in good faith." "Just go back to school, we can do that," Kudlow continued. "And you know, you can social...
    (CNN)White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow on Friday dismissed the difficulties surrounding getting students back into classrooms this fall as coronavirus cases continue to rise in many states and the school year nears."Just go back to school, we can do that," Kudlow told reporters on Friday. "And you know, you can social distance, you can get your temperature taken, you can be tested, you can have distancing -- come on, it's not that hard."Kudlow's comments seemed to run counter to President Donald Trump's dissatisfaction with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines on reopening schools, which the President slammed on Wednesday as "very tough and expensive." Trump also threatened to cut off federal funding for schools if they...
    Coronavirus updates: States ICUs are 89% full NYC restaurant customers bothered by rats while dining outside: report Poll Claims 59% of Parents Won’t Send Their Kids Back to School — But Is That Accurate? An Ipsos poll conducted for USA Today found something perhaps not all too surprising to parents of elementary aged children. According to the poll, which surveyed 2,000 American parents of kids in K-12 learning settings, despite over half of respondents supporting a range of proposals for reopening schools to in-classroom learning, still, 59 percent of parents will likely not return their children to traditional, in-building public school settings in the fall. Another 30 percent said they were “very likely” to not return their children to...
    Murder hornet mania: Hundreds of people think theyve spotted the Asian giant hornet This is what it was like to go to McDonalds in the 1950s Poll Claims 59% of Parents Won’t Sent Their Kids Back to School — But Is That Accurate? An Ipsos poll conducted for USA Today found something perhaps not all too surprising to parents of elementary aged children. According to the poll, which surveyed 2,000 American parents of kids in K-12 learning settings, despite over half of respondents supporting a range of proposals for reopening schools to in-classroom learning, still, 59 percent of parents will likely not return their children to traditional, in-building public school settings in the fall. Another 30 percent said they...
    President Trump blasted virtual classes Friday as he doubled down on his threat to cut funding to public school districts that don’t reopen in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic. “Now that we have witnessed it on a large scale basis, and firsthand, Virtual Learning has proven to be TERRIBLE compared to In School, or On Campus, Learning. Not even close!” the president said in a tweet. “Schools must be open in the Fall. If not open, why would the Federal Government give Funding? It won’t!!!” he added. Trump said earlier this week that he would pressure governors to reopen schools. “We’re very much going to put pressure on governors and everybody else to open the schools, to get them...
    (CNN)Another record-setting day amid a resurgence of Covid-19 cases has forced states to revisit contingency plans to safely reopen US schools.With the US school system in an upheaval since the pandemic began, several governors are beginning to take sides in the debate between national leaders pushing for children to attend classes in person and local officials hesitant to congregate students before it is safe. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has put out guidelines for reopening schools and will soon release more tools to help administrations and parents make decisions, but it is ultimately up to the school districts to decide what is the safest course of action for them, director Robert Redfield told CNN's Anderson Cooper Thursday...
    Author and former New York Times reporter Alex Berenson told "The Story" Thursday that he believes "there is very, very little evidence that masks work to slow the community transition" of coronavirus "or any respiratory virus." "Until this year, if you look at the recommendations that the CDC and other places made about pandemics, they do not encourage the wearing of masks," he told host Trace Gallagher. "I don't know what has changed in the science -- I'm talking about [wearing masks] outside, I'm talking about community wearing by well people, universal masking. I don't know what has changed." On Wednesday, Berenson -- the author of "Unreported Truths about COVID-19 and Lockdowns" -- tweeted that "nothing that's happened in the last three months" supports prolonged lockdowns, mandatory mask orders, or schools closing...
    How did Canada flatten the contagion curve? 3:42 . –– With the summer months set to be full of terrible covid-19 milestones, the drop could look a lot like March and April if the United States doesn’t “take over” this pandemic, an infectious disease expert warns. Daily case records are already being set, intensive care units are reaching capacity, and most states are seeing spikes again, recalling the fear and uncertainty of months ago when the virus broke out. To prevent the outbreak from spiraling out of control, US residents should focus on managing crowds, wearing face masks, and doing a better job of physical distance, Dr. Anthony Fauci told The Wall Street Journal, in a podcast on Wednesday....
    Everyone wishes the schools could simply return to normal in September. I want my kids back in the classroom. In fact, there’s a strong case to be made that the fate of the economy depends on it. But it’s not that simple. It is easy, in our hyperpartisan culture, to make those who are resisting a wholesale reopening sound like they are nervous nellies who don’t care about education. It is just as easy to make those who are pushing for a widespread reopening sound like they don’t care about the risks to students and teachers. And parents are stuck smack in the middle of an untenable situation spawned by the pandemic. Many colleges, including Harvard and the big California...
    SOLANO COUNTY (KPIX) – President Trump on Wednesday publicly pushed schools to reopen this fall even as COVID-19 cases surge across the country. “We’re safely reopening our country, and very importantly, we’re safely reopening our schools, we want the schools reopened,” President Trump said. He then tweeted “May cut off funding if not open!” The threat has left some Bay Area teachers even more concerned about the health and safety of themselves and their students, including Jason Tomlinson, who works as a middle school teacher in Solano County. “To make this COVID thing a political issue, it’s basically, ‘Shame on you,'” Tomlinson said. “If you cut federal funding to a place that’s already gutted and pretty thin, you’re just...
    Kevin Nicholson, CEO and President of No Better Friend Corp., spoke with the Daily Caller’s Samantha Renck about a recent SCOTUS ruling in favor of school choice, concerns over returning to school and more. Nicholson explained how school choice gained traction in 1990 under the guidance of then-Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson alongside Annette “Polly” Williams. “What they saw was the need for an escape valve for many kids living in disadvantaged communities,” Nicholson said, “who didn’t have access to high-quality education. The goal was to create a program that would allow them to basically opt-out of schools where they didn’t think they were [getting] the education they needed and go to schools where they could get a better education.”...
    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told "Your World" Wednesday that the reopening of schools for in-person instruction this fall is "in everyone's interest, particularly the kids' interest." "We are strongly encouraging and urging governors across the country to reopen schools this fall for teachers and administrators, school leaders to be planning for that and anticipating that all kids will be able to be back in school this fall," DeVos told host Neil Cavuto. "There's nothing in the data that suggests it would not be appropriate to have kids in school. And while there may be spikes in certain areas and certain communities, those are exceptions to the rule. The rule should be that kids need to be back in school." TRUMP ADMINISTRATION...
    Coronavirus updates: 41 hospitals in 1 state at full capacity 20 Ways You Could Catch Coronavirus Dining Out Parents Want Schools To Reopen Just as Much as Trump — That’s the Problem Parents are tired. Parents need kids to go back to daycare. Many parents, out of economic necessity,  already have sent their kids back to daycare. And now, with the Fall of 2020 looming, the big question remains: Will public schools re-open. Parents want them to, but should they? © Provided by Fatherly On Tuesday alongside Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, President Trump demanded that all schools across the country fully reopen physically in the fall. Part of Trump’s argument to reopen schools  — despite a whopping total of...
    Education Secretary Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosHigher ed leaders warn House committee of financial strain Trump says White House will pressure governors to open schools DeVos demands 'fully operational' schools in the fall: 'Not a matter of if' MORE said Tuesday that she is “very seriously” considering withholding federal funding from schools that don’t reopen in the fall.  "We are looking at this very seriously, this is a very serious issue across the country," DeVos told Fox News host Tucker Carlson. DeVos, who has recently told state leaders on a conference call that plans to only allow in-person activities a few days a week were unacceptable, arguing that another semester of remote learning will hurt students.  She told Carlson on Tuesday...
    President Donald Trump, alongside Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, are warning that they will cut federal funding from any school that refuses to physically reopen this fall, the Associated Press reported on Wednesday, July 8. The threat adds on to the increasing pressure education leaders are facing as the Trump administration strives to get kids back in school buildings. Trump took to Twitter to vocalize his vexation this morning, citing that countries like Denmark, Norway and Germany have reopened schools with no issues. “The Dems think it would be bad for them politically if U.S. schools open before the November Election, but is important for the children & families. May cut off funding if not open,” Trump tweeted. The president did...
    President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos are threatening to cut federal funding for schools that elect not to fully reopen come the start of the school year this fall. In a tweet Wednesday morning, the president wrote: "In Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and many other countries, SCHOOLS ARE OPEN WITH NO PROBLEMS. The Dems think it would be bad for them politically if U.S. schools open before the November Election, but is important for the children & families. May cut off funding if not open!"In Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and many other countries, SCHOOLS ARE OPEN WITH NO PROBLEMS. The Dems think it… https://t.co/clH3kYsDpw — Donald J. Trump (@Donald J. Trump)1594214198.0Trump added in a separate tweet his...
    Florida will be reopening its schools in the fall, and some teachers in the state are concerned that the move could have deadly consequences, CNN reported. It’s been months since most schoolchildren across the country have seen the inside of a school, since almost every school in the U.S. has been closed since the coronavirus pandemic exploded. And with the summer now halfway over, school officials are looking to the fall, and are grappling with the question of whether to reopen when the traditional fall school calendar resumes in a few weeks, or continue to leave kids at home and rely on homeschooling and distance learning as much as possible. In Florida, that decision has already been made: as NPR...
    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos indicated she is eyeing withholding federal funding from public schools that do no fully reopen for in-person instruction this fall. “Like the president said today, there is no excuse for schools not to reopen again and for kids to be able to learn again full-time,” DeVos said Tuesday on Fox News. "The data doesn’t suggest anything different. The medical experts aren’t suggesting anything different ... this is more an issue of adults who are more interested in their own issues than they are about serving their students. It’s very clear that kids have got to go back to school.” “We are looking at this very seriously,” DeVos said about the possibility of withholding federal...
    Getty St. Vincent de Paul High School student Cameron Vaughn participates in a meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump, fellow students, teachers and administrators about how to safely re-open schools during the novel coronavirus pandemic in the East Room at the White House July 07, 2020 in Washington, DC. As the number of COVID-19 cases surge across southern states like Florida, Texas, Louisiana, South Carolina and Arizona, Trump joined with guests from across the country to discuss how to responsibly return to the classroom. With only about a month or two left for summer break, school districts, faculty, parents and students are all still wondering how to safely continue kids’ educations amidst as cases of coronavirus continue to...
    Savannah Rychcik July 8, 2020 0 Comments National Education Association President Lily Eskelsen Garcia is challenging President Donald Trump to go to a school amid the coronavirus pandemic. Garcia was asked by the host of CNN’s “New Day” Wednesday, Alisyn Camerota if public schools will be ready to open in September. She responded by explaining how reopening schools safely is the most important thing. Garcia criticized Trump, saying he is failing to provide adequate resources to prepare for a safe return. “I double dog dare Donald Trump to sit in a class of 39 sixth graders and breathe that air without any preparation for how we’re going to bring our kids back safely,” Garcia said.Watch her comments below: “I double...
    Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
    NEW YORK (AP) — NYC mayor says schools will be reopened in the fall with a hybrid approach that includes in-person and remote learning. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The president of the nation’s largest teachers’ union hit back at President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries Tucker Carlson ratchets up criticism of Duckworth, calls her a 'coward' Trump on Confederate flag: 'It's freedom of speech' MORE over his demand that schools resume in-person classes this fall, saying reopening cannot take place without guaranteeing the safety of students and staff. “Did you hear the word he didn’t use? ‘Safely’,” National Education Association (NEA) President Lily Eskelsen Garcia said Wednesday in reference to Trump’s event the previous day on reopening schools. “There’s no one that wants our kids back more than teachers … but we want to open it safely,” she said on CNN’s “New Day.” ...
    Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are suing the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) over a new policy that would force foreign students to return home if the courses they are enrolled in are entirely online. “For many students, returning to their home countries to participate in online instruction is impossible, impracticable, prohibitively expensive, and/or dangerous,” the lawsuit filed in District Court in Boston Wednesday morning. BERKELY STUDENTS PLANNING FRAUDULENT COURSE TO CIRCUMVENT ICE RULES, AVOID DEPORTATIONS ICE announced this week that those on F-1 and M-1 student visas would need to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online when they reopen...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump threatens to withhold federal funds from schools that don’t reopen, lashes out at health officials over guidelines. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Tuesday, the president announced his support for opening the country's schools this fall. It seems like a pretty obvious position. But suddenly, it's not. Many people violently disagree with it for reasons that still are not clear, but definitely are not rational. In any case, here's part of what the president said Tuesday. TUCKER CARLSON: CAN THE LEFT REALLY LEAD A COUNTRY IT HATES? We hope that most schools are going to be open. We don't want people to make political statements or do it for political reasons. They think it's going to be good for them politically, so they keep the schools closed. No way. So we're very much going to put pressure on governors and everybody else to...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries Tucker Carlson ratchets up criticism of Duckworth, calls her a 'coward' Trump on Confederate flag: 'It's freedom of speech' MORE on Wednesday threatened to cut off federal funding for schools if they do not resume in-person learning this fall and criticized a top government health agency for being too tough with its guidelines to aid that process. "The Dems think it would be bad for them politically if U.S. schools open before the November Election, but is important for the children & families. May cut off funding if not open!" Trump tweeted. In a separate tweet, Trump said he disagreed with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) "on their very...
    During an interview Tuesday, President Donald Trump dismissed new warnings from Dr. Anthony Fauci about the severity of the coronavirus, saying, “I think we are in a good place. I disagree with him.” “Does that sound like reality that we’re in a good place?” a stunned Anderson Cooper asked viewers Tuesday night. “Those are his actual words. I didn’t actually believe it when I first heard it, but it’s on tape.” Bringing up comments from Dr. Deborah Birx, Cooper dryly asked if it’s “a good place to be” when there are spikes in covid cases in a number of states. He also ripped the president for talking today about reopening schools despite coronavirus concerns, saying “the man whose every...
    Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos told Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight” that there is “no excuse” for public schools not to reopen in the fall. As August approaches and coronavirus cases spike in some areas, debate about how and whether to reopen schools rages across the country. While evidence suggests children are at lower risk for coronavirus, teachers’ unions and other factions tend to favor modified or distance learning, while President Donald Trump and others strongly favor reopening in-person learning. “What can the Department of Education do to make certain that happens?” asked Fox News host Tucker Carlson. WATCH: “Like the president said today there is no excuse for schools not to reopen again and for kids to be...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The State of California is suing the Department of Education over a billion-and-a-half dollars from the CARES Act that Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants to go toward private schools. Xavier Becerra, along with state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond, announced the lawsuit Tuesday. DeVos issued a rule last month that critics say would divert hundreds of millions of aid from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, to private school students. Becerra says such a rule exceeds her authority, undermines Congress’ intent and violates the separation of powers provision in the U.S. Constitution. “This rule distorts Congress’ mandate by requiring the inclusion of private schools based on their total population...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The State of California is suing the Department of Education over a billion-and-a-half dollars from the CARES Act that Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants to go toward private schools. Xavier Becerra, along with state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond, announced the lawsuit Tuesday. DeVos issued a rule last month that critics say would divert hundreds of millions of aid from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, to private school students. Becerra says such a rule exceeds her authority, undermines Congress’ intent and violates the separation of powers provision in the U.S. Constitution. “This rule distorts Congress’ mandate by requiring the inclusion of private schools based on their total population...