29 results - (0.000 seconds)

Stonehenge s:

    The company that owns Florida’s Stonehenge — also known as Coral Castle — is suing Fortnite developer Epic Games for using the name in its new season. Located in Florida, Coral Castle is a rock sculpture garden said to be built by a man named Ed Leedskalnin from 1923 to 1951. It’s run as a museum now, located on the South Dixie Highway in Miami, where patrons can tour the coral rock garden. According to the museum, it’s often known as “Florida’s Stonehenge.” The museum is currently closed, according to its website, but tickets typically cost between $8 to $18. Epic Games added a virtual Coral Castle, a stone structure that’s essentially Atlantis, in its new Fortnite season. Players can...
    Circular structures dating back 4,500 years have been unearthed in Portugal that were once used for ancient ceremonial services. Called ‘timber circles,’ the Bronze Age monument is 65 feet in diameter and akin to the famous Neolithic Stonehenge – but is completely constructed from wood. The entrance aligns with the sun rise in the summer months, as well as during the winter solstice and is the first of its kind to be discovered in the country. Archaeologists discovered the unique structure while excavating the Perdigões complex in the Évora district. Scroll down for video  Circular structures dating back 4,500 years have been unearthed in Portugal that were once used for ancient ceremonial services. Called ‘timber circles,’ the Bronze Age...
    The huge slabs of stone that make up the most iconic structures at Stonehenge came from about 25km away, according to chemical analysis. Since the 1500s, most Stonehenge scholars have assumed the 6- to 7-meter tall, 20-metric-ton sarsen stones came from nearby Marlborough Downs, and a recent study by University of Brighton archaeologist David Nash and his colleagues has now confirmed that. ARS TECHNICAThis story originally appeared on Ars Technica, a trusted source for technology news, tech policy analysis, reviews, and more. Ars is owned by WIRED's parent company, Condé Nast. Recent studies have traced Stonehenge’s bluestones to quarries in the Preseli Hills of western Wales, about 300km (200 miles) away. When another group of archaeologists studied the chemical isotope...
    Geoffrey of Monmouth laid out a theory about the origin of Stonehenge way back in 1136 in his account, titled “The History of the Kings of Britain.” Geoffrey said that Merlin, the wizard of the legend of King Arthur, used magic to move a ring of giant stones from Mount Killaraus in Ireland to a plateau in southern England, where Stonehenge is located. But it turns out that the story is much more ordinary — the stones came from about 15 miles away, according to new research. “Most of the hulking sandstone boulders — called sarsens — that make up the United Kingdom’s famous Stonehenge monument appear to share a common origin 25 kilometers away in West Woods, Wiltshire, according...
    The huge stones at Stonehenge in Southern England came from just 15.5 miles away, according to new research. Most of the sarsens, or sandstone boulders, came from West Woods in the English county of Wiltshire, researchers explain, citing the chemical composition of the stones. The sarsens are up to 30 feet tall and can weigh as much as 25 tons. The research is published in the journal Science Advances. STONEHENGE WAS LIKE ANCIENT 'LEGO,' EXPERTS SAY "Until recently we did not know it was possible to provenance a stone like sarsen," said David Nash, the study’s lead author, in a statement. "It has been really exciting to use 21st century science to understand the Neolithic past and answer a question that...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY WILL DUNHAM Scientists have solved an enduring mystery about Stonehenge, determining the place of origin of many of the megaliths that make up the famed monument in Wiltshire, England, thanks to a core sample that had been kept in the United States for decades. Geochemical testing indicates that 50 of Stonehenge’s 52 pale-gray sandstone megaliths, known as sarsens, share a common origin about 15 miles (25 km) away at a site called West Woods on the edge of Wiltshire’s Marlborough Downs, researchers said on Wednesday. The sarsens were erected at Stonehenge around 2500 BC. The largest stands 30 feet (9.1...
    Stonehenge, a Neolithic wonder in southern England, has vexed historians and archaeologists for centuries with its many mysteries: How was it built? What purpose did it serve? Where did its towering sandstone boulders come from? That last question may finally have an answer after a study published Wednesday found that most of the giant stones -- known as sarsens -- seem to share a common origin 16 miles away in West Woods, an area that teemed with prehistoric activity. The finding boosts the theory that the megaliths were brought to Stonehenge about the same time: around 2,500 BC, the monument's second phase of construction, which in turn could be a sign its builders were from a highly organized society. Get...
    THE origin of the rocks used in Stonehenge has finally been uncovered after decades of archeological research. Here's what we know about one of the UK's oldest historical sites. 4Stonehenge is one of Britain's most iconic landmarks and historical sitesCredit: A.Pattenden How old is Stonehenge? Stonehenge is around 5000 years old. Experts say that the monument was constructed between 3000 and 2000 BC. Instantly recognisable from the surrounding roads, Stonehenge is made up of a ring of standing stones - each of which are around 13ft (4.1 metres) high, 6ft 11in (2.1m) wide and weighing 25 tons. It was built in three stages. The outer bank of Stonehenge was made in around 3000 BC, while the stone settings were...
    The truth isn’t out there. Scientists say they’ve finally pinpointed the origin of the megaliths in the 5,000-year-old Stonehenge monument. Fifty of the 52 massive sandstone sarsens, as they’re called, used in the monument were quarried about 15 miles away from the West Woods in Wiltshire, researchers announced Wednesday after using Geochemical testing to trace back their origins. The sarsens were erected at Stonehenge in 2500 B.C., with the tallest reaching 30 feet high and the heaviest weighing 30 tons. Stonehenge’s smaller bluestones have a different origin story. Those stones have already been traced back to Pembrokeshire in Wales — about 150 miles away. But the source of the sarsens has until now eluded scientists. “The sarsen stones make up...
    A MAJOR Stonehenge puzzle has finally been solved after scientists located the origin of the monument's giant rocks. Modern scanning tech has traced the hulking sandstone boulders that make up Stonehenge to a site in Wiltshire. 6 Archaeologists think most of the larger stones – known as "sarsens" – were quarried in West Woods, just 15 miles away from Stonehenge. That's in contrast to the smaller "bluestones", which were taken from the Preseli Hills in Wales – around 180 miles away. It's been long suspected that the large sarsen stones were taken from the Marlborough Downs, west of London. And this new study confirms the exact area in the Downs where the stones were taken from. 6The Stonehenge sarsens are...
    A photographer captured a remarkable image of the NEOWISE comet streaking over Stonehenge this past Friday. Matthew Brown, who hales from Carmarthern, Wales, said he has taken "thousands upon thousands" of images, but this one may be the "photo of a lifetime," reported British news agency South West News Service. “I’ve taken thousands upon thousands of shots during my career but this has to be one of my favorites," Brown, 37, told the news outlet. “I knew it was going to be one of the clearest nights we had so I had to make my way there. I live in Carmarthen, I thought it was now or never for me to head there and get myself a photo of a...
    Jul 11th 2020 FOR Far more than 4,000 many years Stonehenge has stood on Salisbury Simple in southern Britain. The landscape surrounding the Neolithic monument is made up of many secrets, with options relationship back to much before periods. Obtaining surveyed more than 18 square kilometres in the vicinity, archaeologists proceed to make surprising discoveries. The most up-to-date, a series of deep pits forming a large circle more than two kilometres in diameter, displays how know-how can make it possible to peer even more back into time. Together with their shovels, trowels and brushes, archaeologists have put with each other a toolbox of new technologies. Utilizing magnetometers, which can detect how distinct materials in the floor induce slight improvements in...
    Archaeologists have discovered a massive series of Neolithic-era pits very close to the Stonehenge site in southern England. As with Stonehenge itself its purpose remains a mystery, but the mere detection of the 4,000-5,000-year-old structure, on such a vast scale and so close to one of the world's most recognized prehistoric sites, has left scientists in awe. An image created by the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes archaeological team for a paper published by Internet Archaeology shows the location (red markers) of 20 late Neolithic period pits around the Durrington Walls site in southern England, just a couple miles from Stonehenge, which is visible in the upper left.  Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes/InternetArchaeology The Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes team, a cooperative archaeological effort by a...
    Archaeologists have discovered a huge 1.2-mile-wide ring of Neolithic shafts near Stonehenge in southern England. Experts led by the U.K.’s University of Bradford report that the shafts are up to 32.8 feet wide and 16.4 feet deep. The structures have been carbon-dated to 2500 B.C. Up to 20 shafts have been identified, but archaeologists think that, originally, there may have been more than 30. STONEHENGE WAS LIKE ANCIENT 'LEGO,' EXPERTS SAY The shafts form a ring around the “super henge” at Durrington Walls, a much larger Neolithic monument than Stonehenge. Super henge is located about two miles from Stonehenge and is 15 times larger than its famous counterpart, according to LiveScience. Woodhenge, a prehistoric monument once composed of six rings of wooden...
    Stonehenge has long been one of history’s great mysteries — and the world heritage site has just revealed yet another layer to its story. Archaeologists have discovered a network of underground shafts which span 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) near Stonehenge, presumed to have been built by the same Neolithic peoples who erected Stonehenge 4,500 years ago. It is believed that they served as guideposts leading to Durrington Walls, another one of Britain’s henge monuments, located 1.9 miles northeast of Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. “This is an unprecedented find of major significance within the UK,” said University of Bradford’s Vincent Gaffney, lead researcher on the Stonehenge Hidden Landscape project. He told The Guardian, “Key researchers on Stonehenge and its landscape have...
    George DvorskyJust now•Filed to:StonehengeStonehengeneolithic britainprehistoric monumentsscienceSaveThe circular structure (indicated by the black line) and 20 pits located along its boundary (in red). Image: University of St. Andrews A surprisingly large pit structure has been discovered around Durrington Walls Henge, which is less than 2 miles away from Stonehenge. Dated at 4,500 years old, it’s the biggest prehistoric structure ever found in Britain. Located on Salisbury Plain in the United Kingdom, the circular structure consists of at least 20 carefully positioned pits. Now buried, these pits were huge, at more than 16.5 feet deep (5 meters) and 32 to 66 feet wide (10 to 20 meters). Together, these pits formed a circle measuring more than 1.2 miles in diameter (2 km)....
    Stonehenge has long been one of history’s great mysteries — and the world heritage site has just revealed yet another layer to its story. Archaeologists have discovered a network of underground shafts which span 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) near Stonehenge, presumed to have been built by the same Neolithic peoples who erected Stonehenge 4,500 years ago. It is believed that they served as guideposts leading to Durrington Walls, another one of Britain’s henge monuments, located 1.9 miles northeast of Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. “This is an unprecedented find of major significance within the UK,” said University of Bradford’s Vincent Gaffney, lead researcher on the Stonehenge Hidden Landscape project. He told The Guardian, “Key researchers on Stonehenge and its landscape have...
    CONSPIRACY theories surrounding Stonehenge range from the supernatural to simply odd. We've rounded up some of the most bizarre below, including sex symbol and alien theories. 3Stonehenge is a 5,000 year old prehistoric monumentCredit: Alamy Ancient burial ground Some theories suggest Stonehenge was an elite burial ground. Bone fragments were found at the site centuries ago. However, they weren't regarded as unimportant and were reburied. Archaeologists recently found 50,000 cremated bone fragments, which make up 63 men, women and children from 3000 BC. Alien construction site 3It is thought that hundreds of ancient people built StonehengeCredit: Bradshaw Foundation Conspiracy theories connecting aliens to Stonehenge are quite common. We don't have concrete evidence to prove how the monument was built so...
    London (CNN)A huge, previously undiscovered prehistoric monument has been unearthed just a stone's throw from Stonehenge. Archaeologists working in Durrington, southwest England found evidence of at least 20 prehistoric shafts -- more than 10 meters (33 feet) in diameter and five meters (16 feet) deep -- on the ancient site where Stonehenge sits.The shafts combine to form a circle more than two kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter, archaeologists from the University of St Andrew's said.The monument is most likely Neolithic and was created more than 4,500 years ago, they added. The first stage of Stonehenge was constructed around 3,000 BC."Clearly sophisticated practices demonstrate that the people were so in tune with natural events to an extent that we can barely...
    LONDON (AP) — Archaeologists said Monday that they have discovered a major prehistoric monument under the earth near Stonehenge that could shed new light on the origins of the mystical stone circle in southwestern England. Experts from a group of British universities led by the University of Bradford say the site consists of at least 20 huge shafts, more than 10 meters (32 feet) in diameter and 5 meters (16 feet) deep, forming a circle more than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter. The new find is at Durrington Walls, the site of a Neolithic village about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) from Stonehenge, Researchers say the shafts appear to have been dug around 4,500 years ago, and could...
    ENGLAND (WABC) -- Thousands of people virtually watched and celebrated the summer solstice at the historical site Stonehenge Saturday.Each year, the sun aligns with the stones on the summer solstice.The event usually draws tens of thousands of revelers, but they were warned to stay away this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.Officials decided to stream the sunset online instead.More than 100,000 people watched as the sunset over the monument.MORE CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 COVERAGEabc7NY Phase Tracker: COVID-19 Help, Information. Stimulus and Business UpdatesUPDATES New York CityNew JerseyLong IslandWestchester and Hudson ValleyConnecticut REOPENING INFORMATIONWhat's Open, What's ClosedReopening New York StateReopening New JerseyReopening ConnecticutRELATED INFORMATIONShare your coronavirus story with Eyewitness NewsStimulus check scams and other coronavirus hoaxesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention on coronavirusTotal...
    The coronavirus pandemic prevented druids, pagans, and partiers from watching the sunrise at Stonehenge to celebrate this year’s summer solstice. The ancient stone circle in south west England generally attracts thousands of people to mark the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. But Britain has banned mass gatherings as part of measures to curb the spread of COVID-19. English Heritage, the organization that oversees Stonehenge, broadcast the sunrise live. He said that more than 3.6 million people watched the sunrise on Sunday at 4:52 a.m. (0352 GMT). Stonehenge, which is a World Heritage Site, is believed to be 4,500 years old. It is known for its alignment with the movements of the sun. ...
    LONDON (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has prevented druids, pagans and party-goers from watching the sun rise at Stonehenge to mark the summer solstice this year. The ancient stone circle in southwestern England usually draws thousands of people to mark the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. But Britain has banned mass gatherings as part of measures to contain the spread of COVID-19. English Heritage, the body that oversees Stonehenge, livestreamed the sunrise instead. It said more than 3.6 million people watched as dawn broke at 4:52 a.m. Sunday (0352GMT, 11:52 p.m. EDT Saturday). Stonehenge, a World Heritage site, is believed to be 4,500 years old. It is known for its alignment with the movements of the...
    Security guards are patrolling Stonehenge in a bid to keep revellers away from celebrating the summer solstice. The monument, on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, is a firm favourite for watching the sunrise and sunset on what is the longest day of the year.  Traditionally thousands of druids, hippies and party-goers flock to the famous landmark to celebrate the solstice, but this year's event was cancelled by English because of the coronavirus pandemic. Some senior druids, however, have insisted they will still make their way to the site today - despite the sunrise and sunset being streamed online for the first time ever. A security guard waves away a member of the public attempting to gain access to Stonehenge this...