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    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. Americans have experienced more mental health problems during the coronavirus pandemic than people living in other high-income countries, according to a report issued late last week by the Commonwealth Fund. Americans are also experiencing greater financial hardship — a factor that has contributed to their higher levels of psychological stress — and are less likely than residents of other high-income countries to have a positive opinion of their national government’s pandemic response, the report found. “As our country struggles with the surging number of cases and the economic havoc that the...
    (CNN)The coronavirus pandemic has turned life upside down around the world, with many workers losing their jobs, economies plummeting and parents worried about reopening schools.But the US is being hit harder in more than one way. Not only does the US have the highest number of cases and deaths; the US population is also suffering more mental health consequences than people in other countries, according to a new report from the Commonwealth Fund released on Thursday. "As our country struggles with the surging number of cases and the economic havoc that the pandemic is wreaking, people in other countries are living a different, better reality," Dr. David Blumenthal, president of the Commonwealth Fund, said in a news release alongside the...
    In trying to prevent the transmission of the novel coronavirus, more than a third of U.S. adults are putting their health at risk by using cleaning products incorrectly, according to a recent report. The report in JAMA stated a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that 39% of adults in the U.S. reported using cleaning products and disinfectants in potentially dangerous ways while intending to limit exposure to the deadly virus. CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK ON MAINE BLUEBERRY FARMS SPARKS CONCERN FOR AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY DURING HARVEST SEASON “Drinking or gargling diluted bleach solutions, soapy water, and other cleaning and disinfectant solutions" was one of the dangerous practices the authors of the survey reported. The survey also found that 19% of...
    As the back-to-school debate continues, a new study reveals that young children may carry higher levels of the coronavirus particles in their noses and throats than adults.The study comes as teachers ponder how to return to the classroom.In a widely shared video, 5th-grade teacher Katie O'Connor previewed what her classroom will look like as it's prepped for the pandemic.Children's Hospital of OC reports spike in COVID casesEMBED More News Videos Doctors at Children's Hospital of Orange County say over the last couple of months, they've seen COVID-19 cases double every couple weeks. "In what world is this an elementary school classroom? This stinks," she said, "Look at my desks all spaced out three feet apart."Teachers are torn between wanting to...
    A small study is raising questions about whether young children could be coronavirus super spreaders, even as the country deliberates how to reopen schools in the coming weeks. One of the few silver linings of the COVID-19 pandemic so far has been that the novel coronavirus that has infected more than 17 million people worldwide has largely spared kids. Children are infected at lower rates, and they tend to have milder symptoms — although a rising number have been exhibiting a mysterious multisystem inflammatory syndrome that appears to be related to their body’s immune response to COVID-19 exposure. But how contagious are kids? And could reopening schools lead to more community outbreaks if children (and teachers) become exposed...
    Children under five years of age may harbor up to 100 times as much of the coronavirus in their noses and throats as infected adults and older children, according to a study out of Chicago. “Our analyses suggest children younger than 5 years with mild to moderate COVID-19 have high amounts of SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA in their nasopharynx compared with older children and adults," the researchers stated in the study published in JAMA Pediatrics on Thursday. RECOVERED CORONAVIRUS PATIENT REGAINS SENSE OF SMELL - BUT ONLY FOR FOUL ODORS  "Young children can potentially be important drivers of SARS-CoV-2 spread in the general population, as has been demonstrated with respiratory syncytial virus, where children with high viral loads are more likely to...
    (CNN)The numbers show just how much the coronavirus pandemic has upended Americans' lives over the past four months -- and that things are getting worse.The most startling statistic: More than half of US adults live in households that have lost income from jobs.That share, based on the latest Census Bureau survey conducted from July 16 to July 21, has crept upward in recent weeks. At the same time, the number of Americans who say they haven't worked in the past week also climbed, before declining somewhat in the most recent survey, the last scheduled to be released.The report paints a gloomy picture of the economy, just as Congress and the White House struggle to decide whether to provide another shot...
    Children under five years old can transmit the novel coronavirus just as easily as older kids can, a new study suggests. Researchers found that although youngsters only develop a mild illness, they have viral loads in their noses up to 100 times greater than adults.  The team, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, says the ability of younger children to spread COVID-19 has likely been under-recognized because most schools and daycares closed by late March due to the pandemic.     A new study found children kindergarten-age or younger had viral loads between 10-fold and 100-fold greater in their upper respiratory tract. Pictured:  Cynthia Leonard helps her son, Messi McDaniel, six, during coronavirus testing at the Charles...
    A boy takes a coronavirus test in Los Angeles. Photo: Frederic J. BROWN / . / . In the past nine days, 204 children in Stanislaus County, Sacramento, have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the county public health official explained. But as infections are increasing in the county they have to take action. Dr. Vaishampayan noted that the county has highest infection rate based on population and highest test-positive rate in the state last week. The county reported 234 new cases on Monday, totaling 8,228 confirmed cases and 95 deaths. Since the beginning of the pandemic, 669 Stanislaus County school-age children ages 5-18 tested positive. According to local CBS reports, the doctor says that children spread the...
    STIMULUS checks were delivered faster to wealthy white households than Black and Hispanic families, a study has found. The findings were published on Thursday by the Urban Institute, at a time when lawmakers in Washington are deciding whether an additional round of checks will be sent. 2 A study has found stimulus checks were delivered faster to wealthy white households than Black and Hispanic householdsCredit: Alamy Live News 2 The findings come at a time when lawmakers in Washington are discussing a second round of paymentsCredit: AFP or licensors The findings state that nearly three-quarters of non-Hispanic white adults received their payments – whereas that figure dropped for non-Hispanic Black adults and Hispanic adults. According to the study, 69 percent...
    This article is reprinted by permission from NextAvenue.org. An idea is gaining traction among some economists and scholars to deal with the pandemic in America: Isolate and lock down older Americans, possibly until there is a vaccine. Everyone else gets to go back to work and regain something resembling normalcy. Some proponents call it “shielding” the eldest, usually defined as those 65 and older. Others prefer terms like “targeting” or “cocooning.” One Georgia freeway sign said: “Isolate the Elderly.” I’d label this pandemic proposal wrong, deeply wrong. Simply put, Orwellian age-based segregation will undermine the economy’s vitality, betray society’s values and won’t contain the virus. “Even if we made the value decision that we’re going to isolate people who are over 60, 65, 70...
    As COVID-19 rages on, so does police violence, racism, and protests across the nation. Donald Trump makes his feelings known with regularity (just look at his Twitter), as do people who protest to reopen economies to get haircuts, and as do, too, activists and advocates for toppling statues of Confederate soldiers and colonizers. But what do the majority of Americans think? Checking out the latest Civiqs data uncovers some very intriguing answers when it comes to Black Lives Matter and police budgets. Specifically: Are we allocating too many funds to the police? If so, where should that money be reallocated? And perhaps the biggest picture question, period: Should we not only defund the police but abolish them altogether?  As some background,...
    A record number of adults were living in the same home as their parents or grandparents last April, according to a survey from the U.S. Census Bureau analyzed by researchers from Zillow. 32 million American adults lived with a parent or grandparent in April, the highest on record and an increase of 9.7% from last year. The researchers also found that about 2.7 million adults moved in with their parent or grandparent in March, and over 80% of these adults are members of “Generation Z,” or people between the ages of 18 and 25. “Employment and living situations among this young age group are generally the most in flux even in normal times, and the added uncertainty of the pandemic...
    Coronavirus — We recently unveiled you how the coronavirus could affect children compared to adults from a study carried out in China, but the truth is that the scientific community continues to study the mystery of why the coronavirus would affect children less than older adults and it seems that answers are beginning to be found. The coronavirus mystery: why are children less likely to get it than adults? Rosalind Eggo , assistant professor of mathematical modeling at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and their colleagues have wanted to answer the mystery of the coronavirus regarding how it affects children and adults “What we found was that people under the age of 20 were about half...
    Gaps in knowledge about the novel coronavirus were seen among different races, sexes and ages, a new study suggests. Researchers found that men and people younger than 55 years old knew less about how COVID-19 spreads, and its most common symptoms, than women and older people. Additionally, African Americans had less knowledge about the disease than their white counterparts.  What's more, all three of these groups are at severe risk of illness, especially because all were more likely to leave their homes.  The team, from Harvard University, says the findings suggest that more accurate information about coronavirus needs to be distributed among minority communities, men and younger people.   African Americans were about 12% less likely than whites to know...
    Active military members are hit harder by identity theft and cyber breaches than other adults, according to a new report. From 2015 to 2019, active duty service members were 76% more likely to report current identity theft on current accounts than other adults, the Military Times reported Wednesday, citing research by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Consumer Sentinel Network. Active duty troops are 76 percent more likely to report an identity thief misused one of their accounts, and 3 times more likely to report someone used a debit card or some other electronic means to take money directly from a bank account, says FTC.https://t.co/iEcmNuFjMC pic.twitter.com/7Um6OqAVy9 — Military Times (@MilitaryTimes) June 10, 2020 Problems filed with debt and credit...
    (CNN)Black Americans are much less likely to trust their local police and law enforcement to look out for them and their families than others -- 36% trust the police, while 77% of white people and 69% of Americans overall said the same, according to a poll from Axios-Ipsos out Tuesday morning.Protests over the police killing of a black man, George Floyd, in Minneapolis and racial discrimination from law enforcement came to a head in the United States, sparking riots in many major US cities in the past week. Polling, conducted over the weekend, found that black people don't feel protected by the police, and the majority of Americans see the protests as legitimate. A Monmouth University poll out Tuesday afternoon...