2020-08-07@16:19:09 GMT
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the New York Times:

    It’s great to win the lottery once. How about 25 times? Raymond Harrington won his award with an extraordinary play. Photo: Virginia Lottery / Courtesy That’s what Raymond Harrington accomplished with the Virginia Lottery Pick 4 game. The Virginia Beach man bought 25 Pick 4 lottery plays for the July 17 night drawing. Each of the $ 1 plays contained the same four-digit combination: 4-6-4-0. “Something told me to play 25 times,” Harrington later told Lottery officials. When that combination was drawn in the drawing, each of your tickets won the game’s $ 5,000 jackpot, for a grand total of $ 125,000. The lucky player bought his lottery tickets at Wegman’s located at 4721 Virginia Beach...
    The New York Times quietly deleted advertisement articles paid for by the Chinese Communist Party after growing backlash, the Washington Free Beacon reported Tuesday. The newspaper received over $100,000 per month to print Chinese propaganda, according to China Daily filings representing its activities in the U.S. dating back to 2016. The NYT was also paid $50,000 in 2018 to put Chinese propaganda on its website, according to the Free Beacon. “We made the decision at the beginning of this year to stop accepting branded content ads from state run media, which includes China Daily,” a spokeswoman for the NYT said according to the Free Beacon. The NYT has run over 200 advertorials over the last decade, including ones that downplayed human...
    The New York Times published an op-ed Monday morning titled “Let’s Scrap the Presidential Debates,” arguing that they play too great a role in helping voters choose the president. Journalist Elizabeth Drew assures readers that she is not worried that Biden will lose the debates. “This, by the way, isn’t written out of any concern that Donald Trump will prevail over Joe Biden in the debates; Mr. Biden has done just fine in a long string of such contests,” she writes. The point, she says, is that the debates are meaningless — “that ‘winning’ a debate, however assessed, should be irrelevant, as are the debates themselves.” She argues: Nervous managers of the scheduled 2020 presidential debates are shuffling the logistics and...
    You might never have come across Bon Appetit, a glossy monthly magazine which serves up a cosy mix of gourmet recipes, wine reviews and lifestyle tips to its 1.5 million readers.  It is hard to imagine a less controversial publication, or one that's more quintessentially American with its aspirational blend of self-improvement and conspicuous consumption – and it has been attracting record digital subscriptions thanks to lockdown tips for banana bread and avocado toast. But popularity counted for nothing when a picture appeared online showing its editor of ten years, Adam Rapoport, dressed as a Puerto Rican at a Halloween fancy dress party. At a stroke he was out, branded a racist. Then, in a grovelling mea culpa, he confessed:...
    The New York Times Guild announced Friday that it met with leadership at the newspaper to cultivate “a more diverse and equitable” workplace, and one suggestion is to implement pre-publication “sensitivity reads.” The union announced multiple suggestions it made during a meeting earlier in July. The guild wrote that it believes the NYT needs “a top-to-bottom resetting of priorities to improve the working conditions of our colleagues of color.” “Get it right from the beginning: Sensitivity reads should happen at the beginning of the publication process, with compensation for those who do them,” reads one of the tweets laying out suggestions given. Get it right from the beginning: sensitivity reads should happen at the beginning of the publication process, with...
    Snowball-loving Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) promised President Donald Trump that he would kill any bill that would change the names of military bases currently named after Confederate generals. According to the New York Times‘ Maggie Haberman, Trump called Inhofe while he was sitting in a Washington Italian restaurant Wednesday evening. Trump was so loud that the entire conversation was recorded by someone nearby. “The conversation, overheard and recorded by someone in the room, ranged from a discussion about Anthony Tata, the retired Army brigadier general whose nomination for a top Pentagon policy position has become complicated, to Mr. Trump’s desire to preserve the name of Robert E. Lee, a Confederate general, on a military base,” said the report. “We’re gonna...
    The aviation industry is focused on reviving flights, but is it safe for passengers? The focus of the pandemic is now focused on the revival of activities, both social and commercial. Many are the industries that have been affected, but few have suffered such devastating effects as the aerial. The International Civil Aviation Organization is working to achieve the reactivation and stability of aeronautical activity worldwide. For this, it has generated documents such as the CART-Take Off, which serve as a guide. This establishes, among others, disinfection measures and a higher cleaning frequency. At first glance, social distancing does not seem to be compatible with commercial passenger air traffic. However, regulatory bodies are already working against the clock to devise...
    Breitbart News provides a “much truer understanding of the world” than the New York Times, noted Dennis Prager, sharing his assessment of this news media outlet in an interview with Breitbart News Editor-in-Chief Alex Marlow on Wednesday’s edition of the former’s eponymous radio show. “You do a great job,” said Prager to Marlow. “Breitbart.com is one of the most important sites in America.” Prager added, “If you only read the New York Times or only read by Breitbart, you would have a much truer understanding of the world with the latter. So, keep up the good work, Alex.” “One of the most powerful voices on the Internet in the world is Breitbart,” stated Prager, “and they have an enormous readership...
    This is a press release from the Georgia Secretary of State’s Office: In an effort to further the false liberal narratives about Georgia’s elections record, a recent New York Times article (“Anatomy of An Election ‘Meltdown’ in Georgia,” July 25) contained numerous errors. “We can’t comment on whether the multitude of falsehoods in the story resulted from intent or incompetence, but we will correct the record,” said Walter Jones, Voter Education manager and former journalist. “This story is yet more in a long string of national media stories that swallow liberal lines of attack about Georgia’s voting procedures that have no basis in reality. Georgia, like many other...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City By Julie Menin, Director of NYC Census 2020  New York City is facing an unprecedented, multi-layered political, economic, and public health crisis like none other it has faced in the past. After being the global epicenter of the COVID-19 crisis for months, we are left with an economy that is a shell of its recent self, and we are rudderless in terms of the sorely-needed federal response to our public health and economic crises.  As Chair of Manhattan Community Board 1 in the immediate aftermath of 9/11, I saw first-hand the unthinkable devastation wrought by the last disaster in our city’s...
    In the latest laughable attempt to find something racist to condemn, The New York Times has taken aim at the official seal of the City of New York. As you can see here, the seal shows a Native American wearing a loincloth and a Dutch settler holding a rope with what the Times now says “appears to be a loop on its end” — the implication being that it just might be a noose. Yet only the ignorant could be triggered: It’s not even the right size for that; the “loop” is actually a stone — the Dutchman is a sailor holding a plummet, a device used to measure the depth of water off a boat. Just 12 years ago,...
    Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., said on Monday that "the New York Times should not be teaching American history to kids" amid the push for material from the news organization’s '1619 Project' to be incorporated in school programs. “Many founders believed that only with the union and the Constitution could we put slavery on the path to its ultimate extinction,” Cotton told “Fox & Friends.” “That’s exactly what Lincoln said,” Cotton added. Cotton said that leading historians, including James McPherson and Gordon Wood, have debunked the 1619 project. TOM COTTON RIPS NY TIMES FOR RUNNING CHINA SCIENTIST'S OP-ED SLAMMING US VIRUS RESPONSE Meanwhile, Cotton on Thursday introduced a bill that proposed denying federal funds to schools that incorporate The New York Times’ controversial “1619 Project” into its teaching curriculum....
    Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton sparked outrage by calling the enslavement of millions of African people in the early years of the United States a 'necessary evil'.   Cotton, an outspoken Republican, made the jarring remark in an interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette on Sunday as he promoted a new bill that would defund schools that teach the New York Times' controversial 1619 Project about slavery in the US.   The senator argued that slavery is a critical piece of American history, saying: 'As the founding fathers said, it was the necessary evil upon which the union was built, but the union was built in a way, as Lincoln said, to put slavery on the course to its ultimate extinction.' Cotton later defended his...
    A Pentagon consultant and astrophysicist told the New York Times that he reported to the Department of Defense about “vehicles not made on Earth. The Pentagon could soon publish publicly findings on unidentified aerial phenomena he’s been studying, according to a new report published in The New York Times. While the Pentagon has previously stated that it “dissolved a once undercover program to investigate unidentified flying objects (UFO), the effort is still ongoing, “but the program was simply” renamed and hidden within the Office of Naval Intelligence, “according to the Times. Perhaps more explosively, at least one Pentagon consultant and subcontractor, astrophysicist Eric Davis, who has worked with these government programs since 2007, told Times reporters that he “delivered...
    David Becker/Getty Images The New York Times on Friday issued a significant correction on a story in which the paper claimed former Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) said alien objects had crashed on Earth and been studied for years by government and private entities. The correction was appended to a July 23 story suggesting Reid “said he believed that crashes of vehicles from other worlds had occurred and that retrieved materials had been studied secretly for decades, often by aerospace companies under government contracts.” The Times said in its July 24 correction the article had “inaccurately rendered” Reid’s remarks. “Mr. Reid said he believed that crashes of objects of unknown origin may have occurred and that retrieved materials should be...
    The Wall Street Journal editorial board told readers Thursday that “these pages won’t wilt under cancel-culture pressure” after a letter signed by hundreds of staff members criticized the paper’s op-ed section. After readers expressed concerns about a letter that 280 WSJ colleagues signed criticizing the news outlet’s opinion section, the editorial board responded in a note to readers. “It was probably inevitable that the wave of progressive cancel culture would arrive at the Journal, as it has at nearly every other cultural, business, academic and journalistic institution,” the WSJ editorial board said. “But we are not the New York Times. Most Journal reporters attempt to cover the news fairly and down the middle, and our opinion pages offer an alternative...
    Disgruntled WSJ Reporters Rip WSJ’s Conservative Op-Ed Pages. Editorial Board Fires Back, ‘We Are Not The New York Times’
    Serial Productions, the studio behind Serial and S-Town, is now part of The New York Times. According to The Wall Street Journal, the newspaper has agreed to purchase the podcast-maker in a deal that could be worth up to $50 million, depending on milestones and performance metrics. A report from The Times itself says the acquisition will give the studio a way to produce more shows. The team usually works on one project at a time, but having NYT as a parent company means they have access to more resources. Sam Dolnick, an NYT assistant managing editor for audio said the studio’s podcasts could also tap into the paper’s journalist pool for future stories. And when the studio puts out...
            by Ned Ryun  The mainstream press has spent a lot of time and energy recently attacking Tucker Carlson, none more enthusiastically than CNN’s simpering and shrieking little eunuch, Brian Stelter. Of course Carlson, with the No. 1 rated show in the history of cable news, can laugh all the way to the bank in response to most of these critics. This is nothing new: Fox News is used to its top stars being attacked by the thought-monolith, leftist media and benefitting from the drama in the ratings. For those of us on the Right, it’s amusing and tiresome all at once. But at the same time, disturbing undertones are emerging in these stories. On Monday,...
    The New York Times has acquired the audio production company behind the popular podcast series Serial, which is widely credited with helping popularize the modern narrative podcast movement. The company, called Serial Productions, was formed in 2017 by Sarah Koenig, Julie Snyder, and Ira Glass after the success of the podcast’s initial season three years prior, and the team has gone on to produce two follow-up seasons of Serial and a standalone podcast called S-Town. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. As part of the deal, The Times is entering into what’s being described as an “ongoing creative and strategic alliance” with This American Life, the syndicated radio program from which Serial was originally spun off and for...
    New York (CNN Business)The New York Times (NYT) announced on Wednesday it is acquiring Serial Productions, the company behind the namesake podcast series "Serial." Sarah Koenig, Julie Snyder and Ira Glass launched "Serial" in 2014 while working at "This American Life," the weekly public radio program. "Serial" made a big impact in the podcast industry and popular culture. Each episode of the first season saw an average of 20 million downloads, according to The Times. In 2017, the trio formed Serial Productions. The Times also announced Wednesday it will partner with "This American Life," which includes selling its advertising."Journalistically, we've been enormous admirers of 'Serial' and 'This American Life' for years," Sam Dolnick, assistant managing editor at The Times, told...
    Back in April, Californians didn’t see this coming. But on Wednesday, the Golden State overtook New York for the dreadful distinction of recording the most coronavirus cases in the country since the pandemic began. Statistically, it shouldn’t be too surprising that the largest state in the country with 40 million residents would account for the largest number of infections. As the graphic below shows, New York was the epicenter of the virus in the early months of the pandemic, and by the end of April the Empire State was reporting more than 6 times as many cases as California. Fast-forward to June and July, and it’s easy to see their fortunes — and coronavirus infections curves — cross. ...
    Trump Challenges Mayors on Crime; NYPD Clears Camp: Protest Wrap A Lawsuit Against Burger King Over The Impossible Whopper Has Been Dismissed Meredith Kopit Levien will be the next CEO of The New York Times The New York Times announced Wednesday Meredith Kopit Levien, the newspaper's chief operating officer, will become its next president and chief executive officer. Levien will succeed Mark Thompson, 62, who has served as CEO since 2012, on Sept. 8. © New York Times Meredith Levien appointed to president and CEO of New York Times Levien, 49, will become the youngest CEO in the media organization's 168-year history. She joined The Times in 2013 as head of advertising and was promoted to executive...
    He made the request with the help of Woody Johnson, the United States’ ambassador to Great Britain. President Trump would have incurred a conflict of interest. Photo: Jeff J Mitchell / . President Donald Trump he would have wanted to be the host of the British Golf Open, one of the four major tournaments on the PGA tour, after trying to make your resort Trump Turnberry in Scotland received the important contest in 2018. Trump would have resorted to Woody Johnson, United States Ambassador to Great Britain, owner of the New York Jets in the NFL and donor of his presidential campaign, so that he evaluated the possibility that the British government was involved in the...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Tucker Carlson says The New York Times wants to put his family in danger, the newspaper says he knowingly lied and now the Fox News host’s fans are taking up the fight. The latest media conflagration flaring Tuesday is more than ideological, with issues of personal privacy and safety at its heart. Carlson, the prime-time host who has just returned from a vacation after his top writer quit for publishing racist material online, said Monday on Fox News Channel that the Times was working on a story about where he and his family live. He said there’s “no conceivable justification” journalistically for such a story. “Why is The New York Times doing a story on the...
    By DAVID BAUDER, AP Media Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Tucker Carlson says The New York Times wants to put his family in danger, the newspaper says he knowingly lied and now the Fox News host's fans are taking up the fight. The latest media conflagration flaring Tuesday is more than ideological, with issues of personal privacy and safety at its heart. Carlson, the prime-time host who has just returned from a vacation after his top writer quit for publishing racist material online, said Monday on Fox News Channel that the Times was working on a story about where he and his family live. He said there's “no conceivable justification” journalistically for such a story. “Why is The New York...
    Members of the Ochs-Sulzberger family — which owns The New York Times Company — were slaveowners and held sympathetic views towards the Confederacy in the 19th century, an opinion column in the New York Post concluded. The Ochs-Sulzberger family’s reported connection to slavery and the Confederacy is linked to Adolph Ochs and his mother Bertha Levy Ochs, according to the New York Post. Ochs initiated the family’s ownership of the Times after he bought the paper in 1893. The maternal side of his family reportedly owned slaves and participated in the Civil War. A re-enactment of the Battle of Gettysburg (John Moore/Getty Images) Bertha Levy Ochs, a Jewish immigrant from Germany, lived with her paternal uncle John Mayer in Natchez,...
    He described Esther Salas as “a lazy and incompetent Latino judge appointed by Obama” Crime scene in North Brunswick, NJ Photo: Michael Loccisano / . Roy Den Hollander, a lawyer found dead in New York yesterday after being suspected of shooting the husband and son of prosecutor Esther Salas (NJ), suffered from terminal cancer and this may have motivated him to plan attacks against judges he considered “feminist”, according to the hypotheses that are handled. Hollander (72), who litigated as a lawyer for men’s rights, may have also been involved in the murder of another lawyer, Marc Angelucci, in California on July 11. According to witnesses, last Sunday afternoon he appeared Federal Express deliveryman dress by...
    White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany took aim Tuesday at The New York Times, calling a recent attack on White House Coronavirus Task Force member Dr. Deborah Birx “appalling.” McEnany closed out Tuesday morning’s White House press briefing with praise for Birx, adding that the NYT should be “very ashamed.” (RELATED: ‘Dereliction Of Duty’: Kayleigh McEnany Fires Back At Chicago Mayor Over ‘Karen’ Remark) WATCH: McEnany mentioned a recent article in the NYT which suggested that the White House had favored Birx because she had been the only expert to consistently present President Donald Trump with a rosier forecast regarding the coronavirus pandemic. Inside Trump’s Failure: The Rush to Abandon Leadership Role on the Virus — strong reporting by...
    The New York Times‘s editorial positions reveal the consequences of a far-left takeover of America, stated Mike Cernovich, producer of Hoaxed, on Monday’s edition of SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Daily with host Alex Marlow. The New York Times publishes justifications for “domestic terrorism,” said Cernovich. “When someone tweets out that the Portland Police Association building was a well-chosen target, and burning was a justified act of protest against a valid target, that’s literally advocating domestic terrorism,” Cernovich stated. Antifa enjoys “glowing press coverage” from the New York Times, added Cernovich.  “It’s not hard to realize what is going to happen to us if the far left takes power,” added Cernovich. “Is your house going to be a proper target according to these people?...
    Could Bari Weiss Bring A Legal Case Against The New York Times? Guy Benson Suggests It Could Be Possible.
    Two of the most popular clubs in Mexico vie for the title of the friendly tournament This Sunday will end one of the presets that have generated the most controversy in Aztec football, with the final of the Cup for Mexico between Chivas and Blue Cross, in a duel where pride will be at stake. The Flock and the Machine have shown their weapons in this mini tournament that serves as a preview of the Guard1anes 2020 which will be launched next Thursday; and for both clubs one of their greatest strengths has been their offense. For Chivas, it seems that they get better and better coupled up front with Alexis Vega and José Juan Macías, although unfortunately “JJ”...
    It’s far worse than I thought. In addition to the many links between the family that owns The New York Times and the Civil War Confederacy, new evidence shows that members of the extended family were slaveholders. Last Sunday, I recounted that Bertha Levy Ochs, the mother of Times patriarch Adolph S. Ochs, supported the South and slavery. She was caught smuggling medicine to Confederates in a baby carriage and her brother Oscar joined the rebel army. I have since learned that, according to a family history, Oscar Levy fought alongside two Mississippi cousins, meaning at least three members of Bertha’s family fought for secession. Adolph Ochs’ own “Southern sympathies” were reflected in the content of the Chattanooga Times, the...
    You know the difference between a good owner and a bad owner? Actually, it’s a trick question. The people who own sports franchises aren’t judged on anywhere close to a judicious fashion. If you were a stockholder in the team, and that team sold almost every seat and maximized every dollar, like a certain pro basketball team based in Manhattan, you probably feel differently about the person at the top than others might. Of course, we only care about wins and losses in sports, so that tends to be the filter through which we judge owners. The Mets — you may have heard — are up for sale, and so there is massive speculation about what kind of owner Steve...
    The Gray Lady’s convulsions continue. Former New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson says she’s dismayed by the troubles surrounding the New York Times op-ed section, particularly the departure of its editor James Bennet after he published a commentary by a U.S. senator calling for military force to quell riots. “I don’t think that James Bennet should have been forced out at The Times,” Abramson told The Post, adding she “felt terrible” about it. “He and I worked together in the Washington Bureau of the Times and I think he is one of the great journalists of our time. So I was very sad to see him pushed out,” Abramson said. Abramson, who led the Times newsroom from September 2011...
    Reporters are commencing to piece together the driving-the-scenes events of the unparalleled Twitter assault on Wednesday just about as rapidly as the official investigators them selves. And the clearest strategy of what might have took place two times back — when about 130 accounts have been compromised applying internal organization equipment — will come courtesy of The New York Moments this afternoon. Reporters Nathaniel Popper and Kate Conger convey to the tales of four people today associated in the hack and how accurately it spiraled out of manage and resulted in the takeovers of some of the platforms most high-profile and sensitive accounts.The Times’ report says the central hacker bought access to Twitter systems by means of Slack messagesThe Situations...
    Reporters are starting to piece together the behind-the-scenes events of the unprecedented Twitter attack on Wednesday almost as fast as the official investigators themselves. And the clearest idea of what may have happened two days ago — when roughly 130 accounts were compromised using internal company tools — comes courtesy of The New York Times this afternoon. Reporters Nathaniel Popper and Kate Conger tell the stories of four individuals involved in the hack and how exactly it spiraled out of control and resulted in the takeovers of some of the platforms most high-profile and sensitive accounts. The Times’ report says the central hacker got access to Twitter systems via Slack messages The Times report says the attack can...
    This is a rush transcript from "Hannity," July 15, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated. SEAN HANNITY, HOST: Fox News alert: Major developments on multiple fronts. After an extremely successful trial period, Moderna's coronavirus vaccine is now ready to enter the final phase of testing. We have other vaccines also on the horizon. We'll have full coverage. This is remarkable, maybe by the fall, a record- breaking progress. Our medical A-Team, Dr. Oz, is here tonight. Also breaking tonight, the 2020 election has now officially changed in a dramatic and a big way. The president is now bowing to take actions in American cities with warzone-like conditions. But the bumbling barely there,...
    Conservative firebrand Rush Limbaugh defended former New York Times opinion editor and columnist Bari Weiss after she publicly lambasted the news organization for what she characterized as institutional intolerance for conservative thought or commentary. "Twitter is not on the masthead of The New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor. As the ethics and mores of that platform have become those of the paper, the paper itself has increasingly become a kind of performance space," Weiss wrote in a resignation letter to New York Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger. "Stories are chosen and told in a way to satisfy the narrowest of audiences, rather than to allow a curious public to read about the world and then draw...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio. During the second hour, Carmichael weighed in on Jeff Sessions’ Senate loss in Alabama and The New York Times opinion editor Bari Weiss’ resignation. Leahy: We are joined this morning as we often are on Wednesdays by our good friend, the original all-star panelist, and who’s been on the airwaves here in Nashville, Tennessee although not consecutively but for a least 35 years I think it is Crom. Carmichael: Long time....
    Jill Abramson, former executive editor of the New York Times, defended her old newspaper's reputation after one of its opinion editors resigned and released a letter decrying the culture in the newsroom. "I think that the departure of one junior-level opinion editor at the New York Times is really a molehill compared to the mountains of news developments that you’ve just been talking about on your show," Abramson said Wednesday on Fox News's Outnumbered Overtime with Harris Faulkner. "Bari Weiss’s letter was a strong letter, certainly, and it was bound to get some reaction, but in the scheme of things it does not spell crisis for the New York Times." Weiss, whose resignation was revealed this week, shared her letter...
    Popular radio host Rush Limbaugh ripped The New York Times after former opinion editor Bari Weiss left the newspaper abruptly citing years of public bullying from fellow employees. Weiss announced her resignation in an open letter to NYT publisher A.G. Sulzberger on Tuesday. Limbaugh read sections of the letter on air Tuesday, calling it “fascinating” and “a very teachable moment.” In the letter, Weiss says that the NYT’s editorial decisions are directed to a large degree based on reactions from Twitter users. The social media mob has even influenced the paper’s personnel decisions, such as in the case of James Bennet, Weiss’ predecessor. Bennet was reprimanded by NYT leadership after publishing an op-ed written by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) and...
    Conservative columnist Andrew Sullivan announced he is leaving New York magazine this week, saying the reasons for the split were 'pretty self-evident'. He said he would elaborate in his final column on Friday Conservative columnist Andrew Sullivan has announced he is leaving New York magazine this week, saying the reasons for the split were 'pretty self-evident'. Sullivan's announcement came after New York Times opinion editor Bari Weiss revealed on Tuesday she had quit in a scathing resignation letter that slammed the newspaper for fostering an 'illiberal environment' and allegedly allowing her to be bullied by coworkers for 'wrongthink'. 'This will be my last week at New York Magazine,' Sullivan, who has worked at New York magazine since 2016, tweeted.  'I'm sad...
    Fox News contributor Michael Goodwin said that former opinion columnist Bari Weiss’ scathing resignation letter to The New York Times is “devastating” to the news organization. “The picture she paints of what is going on there is, I have to say, worse than I suspected,” the New York Post columnist and former New York Times bureau chief told “Fox & Friends.” “What she describes is bullying, harassment, and anti-Semitism. Attacking her all the time to her face, behind her back on these discussion chat rooms. It’s quite striking. “She also describes how the publisher did nothing about it. The top editors did nothing about it but they privately encouraged her and praised her for her bravery and she said, ‘Why does it take bravery to...
    Bari Weiss shook the media landscape on Tuesday with her scathing letter announcing her departure from The New York Times, but CNN and MSNBC viewers were kept in the dark. Shortly after Vice's report that Weiss was leaving the Times, Weiss confirmed her exit by publishing the letter she had written to the paper's Publisher A.G. Sulzberger on her personal website. Weiss began trending on Twitter, with prominent conservatives praising her brutal takedown of the Times, while many liberal journalists dismissed and mocked the now-former opinion editor. However, despite the turmoil that was on display at one of the nation's most revered papers, CNN and MSNBC chose to ignore the stunning developments in Tuesday's coverage. LIBERAL JOURNALISTS DISMISS, MOCK BARI...
    Nothing stings like criticism from an insider. Bari Weiss, a New York Times op-ed editor whose sin was not being a lockstep left-winger, has delivered a scathing indictment of the paper’s out-of-control liberal culture--in the form of a resignation letter. Her open letter to Publisher A.G. Sulzberger might sound overheated coming from an outside critic. But Weiss, a controversial writer hired from the Wall Street Journal opinion section, says some colleagues have privately complained to her of a “new McCarthyism” at the Times. Weiss says she’s been “the subject of constant bullying by colleagues who disagree with my views. They have called me a Nazi and a racist; I have learned to brush off comments about how I’m ‘writing about...
    The New York Times has been criticized after running with an unverified story about a Texas man who died after attending a “COVID party.” The newspaper published an article July 12 claiming that “a 30-year-old man who believed the coronavirus was a hoax and attended a ‘Covid party’ died after being infected with the virus.” The article cited Methodist Hospital in San Antonio’s chief medical officer Dr. Jane Appleby, who claimed the man told his nurse before dying that he believed the virus was a hoax and had attended the party. “The Times could not independently verify Dr. Appleby’s account,” the publication’s current version of the article reads. “On Monday, the San Antonio health department said its contact tracers did not have...
    Many liberal journalists shrugged off the fiery exit of New York Times opinion editor Bari Weiss, some even mocking the writer over the open letter she had penned to the paper's publisher. While many conservatives rallied behind Weiss after she released the letter detailing the abuse she faced from her Times colleagues and how the Twitter mob "has become its ultimate editor" of the paper, members of the mainstream media were not merely as concerned, some even mocked her. "I don’t know what a Bari Weiss is. Sounds like a type of flower," MSNBC correspondent Garrett Haake reacted. "But have you heard about the raging global pandemic that’s killing hundreds of Americans every day, and that demands all of us...
    New York Times opinion writer Bari Weiss has announced she has quit in a scathing resignation letter that slams the newspaper for fostering an 'illiberal environment' and censoring centrist opinions. Weiss, who joined the Times in 2017, said the paper of record was among the media institutions now betraying their standards and losing sight of their principles as she accused them of only publishing stories that 'satisfy the narrowest of audiences'.    In her lengthy resignation later addressed to publisher A.G. Sulzberger and posted on her website on Tuesday, Weiss claimed that intellectual curiosity and risk-taking was now a 'liability' at the Times. The controversial editor and writer said the opinions of those on Twitter had become the newspaper's 'ultimate editor'. Weiss also accused the...
    Saying that “Twitter has become its ultimate editor,” New York Times columnist and editor Bari Weiss resigned yesterday with a scathing letter to the paper. Weiss, one of the few centrist voices at The Times, said that she faced bullying at the paper for her views, and that the free exchange of ideas on the opinion pages was now dead. The search for truth has been replaced by “orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.” Addressed to publisher A.G. Sulzberger, Weiss bemoans how The Times has strayed from the ideals laid out by Adolph Ochs in 1896, that the paper should publish “all shades of opinion.” Here is the full text of the...
    New York (CNN)Bari Weiss, a controversial opinion writer for The New York Times, resigned from the newspaper on Monday, a spokesperson for the newspaper said on Tuesday.Kathleen Kingsbury, The Times' acting editorial page editor, thanked Weiss in a statement for her "many contributions.""I'm personally committed to ensuring that The Times continues to publish voices, experiences and viewpoints from across the political spectrum in the Opinion report," Kingsbury said. "We see every day how impactful and important that approach is, especially through the outsized influence The Times's opinion journalism has on the national conversation." New York Times publisher responds to staff outrage over Tom Cotton op-edBut in the resignation letter Weiss posted online, the self-described "politically homeless" writer blasted The Times for...
    (Don Emmert/AFP, Getty Images) New York Times opinion editor and writer Bari Weiss has left the paper, the paper said Tuesday. The New York Times confirms Bari Weiss’ departure, as first reported by Vice: https://t.co/S1PqOE2WC5 pic.twitter.com/xRYD6CQ2ld — Jeremy Barr (@jeremymbarr) July 14, 2020 Weiss has been a subject of scrutiny since members of the Times staff attacked the editorial team’s decision to publish a column by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR). In a Twitter thread, Weiss detailed the newsroom as a “civil war.” Weiss also said the internal strife at the New York Times newsroom is the “same one raging inside other publications around the country.” She was ripped on social media and by her colleagues for those comments. Weiss joined...
    New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet continues to be there, for some reason, despite recent blunders and buffoonery from the paper (like the Tom Cotton op-ed pressing for military violence against protesters—the one the Times editors solicited, but allegedly never bothered to read before publishing). As such, the Times will remain incapable of any introspection into just how badly their journalistic model has failed in an era when government officials are brazenly lying to the public on a daily, briefing-by-briefing basis, or what true journalism might look like when the old model—inviting important people to make declarations to the public while demurring on whether any of it is, say, openly fraudulent—becomes a tool for defrauding the public, rather than a tool for preventing it. The man and...
    More Americans are dying from coronavirus nationwide as the pandemic rages in the southern and western parts of the country, statistics show. More than 134,600 people in the US have now died of COVID-19, a figure that’s increased over the last two weeks — with 27 states, including Florida, Texas, California and Arizona, seeing a rise in fatalities. There were 802 deaths in the country on Friday alone, according to a report. In New York, however, the pandemic remained under control with the lowest average deaths and hospitalizations in the state since mid-March, Gov. Cuomo said Saturday. In the past three days, COVID-19 deaths statewide were in the single digits, with just 6 reported Friday, and hospitalizations fell to below...
    New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet continues to be there, for some reason, despite recent blunders and buffoonery from the paper (like the Tom Cotton op-ed pressing for military violence against protesters—the one the Times editors solicited, but allegedly never bothered to read before publishing). As such, the Times will remain incapable of any introspection into just how badly their journalistic model has failed in an era when government officials are brazenly lying to the public on a daily, briefing-by-briefing basis, or what true journalism might look like when the old model—inviting important people to make declarations to the public while demurring on whether any of it is, say, openly fraudulent—becomes a tool for defrauding the public, rather than a tool...
    A New York City ER doctor who killed herself at the height of the coronavirus crisis told friends she felt she 'couldn't help anyone' and was 'embarrassed' when she suffered a breakdown because of mental health stigma in the medical community. Dr. Lorna M. Breen, 49, the medical director of the emergency department at New York-Presbyterian Allen Hospital, committed suicide in Charlottesville, Virginia on April 26. Her tragic death came just weeks after she recovered from coronavirus and days after she was discharged from a psychiatric ward following a mental health episode. Breen's devastated family, friends and colleagues spoke out about her shock suicide to the New York Times and told how they believe it was triggered by her traumatic work...
    Director Mira Nair is set to adapt the 2020 Pulitzer Prize finalist New York Times story and podcast “The Jungle Prince of Delhi” as a drama series for Amazon. Written by Ellen Barry, the article reveals the truth about the history of royal family of Oudh, who lived in a ruined palace in Delhi and claimed to be the heirs to the fallen kingdom, according to Variety. “Exciting News: The Jungle Prince, my piece about one of Delhi’s great legends, a mysterious family who lived in a ruined palace in the forest, will be adapted by @MiraPagliNair, Amazon & Sister Pictures, the producers of Chernobyl,” Barry tweeted with a link to the story. Leonardo DiCaprio, Barry Jenkins on Board for Netflix’s...
    The New York Times’ massive campaign to pressure social media giants into restricting freedom of information — particularly dissemination from sources other than mainstream outlets — has now kicked into high gear. Tech columnist Kevin Roose warned the Times readership earlier this year that they should “buckle up for another Facebook election,” in which the platform will supposedly be “overrun with hyperpartisan misinformation” like the kind that “proved to be a decisive force in 2016.” Roose isn’t the only voice at the Times promoting the notion that Facebook’s role in allowing free flow of information results in election corruption. Contributing opinion writer Kara Swisher has devoted outsized attention to the supposed problem of Facebook’s unwillingness to crack down on those she deems insufficiently woke. The goal here is obvious: force Facebook to...
    New York (CNN Business)Mary Trump, President Trump's niece, reveals in her forthcoming tell-all book that she was a source for The New York Times' Pulitzer Prize-winning story about the President's tax returns.The Times' article — published in October 2018 by reporters David Barstow, Susanne Craig, and Russ Buettner — revealed that "through dubious tax schemes" Trump received "the equivalent today of at least $413 million from his father's real estate empire."The Times said in its story at the time the article was based on tens of thousands of confidential records it had obtained.In her book, "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man," Mary Trump said that she provided the reporters 19 boxes of...
    The New York Times published a seemingly bombshell report June 26 claiming that President Donald Trump had been briefed on intelligence about a Russian spy unit allegedly paying Taliban-linked militants to carry out attacks against U.S. troops. Days later, the publication issued a second report undercutting its original story – after the White House, the Pentagon, national security advisor Robert O’Brien and others denied it. In light of the NYT softening its bombshell report, here’s a look back at some of the other moments when the publication has stumbled while reporting on matters of US intelligence. (RELATED: With Follow-Up Report, NYT Subtly Undercuts Key Aspects Of Its Russia-Taliban Bounty Scoops) NYT first reported in definitive terms that Trump was briefed on the Russian bounty report, but...
    How exactly does The New York Times decide who gets to remain anonymous? Our question is prompted by its move to reveal the full name of an anodyne blogger — threatening serious disruption of his life — apparently just because it can. The blog is The Slate Star Codex, written by a Bay Area psychiatrist who shares only his first and middle names, Scott Alexander. For years, he’s written on a smattering of topics, from psychiatry and pharmacology to tribalism in the era of social media and Marxism’s failings as a science. His posts early on proved prescient about the course of the coronavirus, which is what prompted a Times reporter to come calling — and announce that the story...
    A video from the New York Times detailed the reasons that many black Americans feel the need recently to purchase firearms to protect themselves and their families. Kat Traylor One black woman detailed how she worked to pass more gun restrictions but then decided that she needed to arm herself in order to protect her family. "I've been fighting for gun regulations in my state for eight years," said Kat Traylor, of Aurora, Colorado. "Regardless of who was in office, our lives didn't get any better for black and brown communities, in fact they just stayed the same," she explained. "That's when the realization hit, until we have legislation and all the wrong people don't have...
    Twitter has removed a photo tweeted by Donald Trump for violating its copyright policy after the New York Times filed a complaint over the use of their image. Trump posted a photo of himself on Tuesday that was taken by NYT photographer Damon Winter for a feature on the then-presidential candidate in 2015. The black and white picture showed a smirking Trump sitting down while pointing at the camera, but was turned into a meme with bold white text saying: 'In reality, they're not after me they're after you. I'm just in the way.'  On Wednesday, the photo had disappeared from the president's account and the tweet instead showed a 'media not displayed' notice. Twitter confirmed that the meme had...
    The New York Times has faced intense backlash over its report about the history of Mount Rushmore. Ahead of President Trump's scheduled Fourth of July celebration at the national monument, the Times ran a report with the headline "How Mount Rushmore Became Mount Rushmore," which outlined how the upcoming event "invited even more scrutiny" regarding the landmark's history. Along with the criticisms George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Theodore Roosevelt have faced in recent weeks, the Times reported the condemnation from Native Americans since the monument was built on indigenous land. It also noted how the sculptor Gutzon Borglum had "strong bonds with leaders of the Ku Klux Klan" and has a documented history of espousing white supremacist and anti-Semitic rhetoric. However,...
    It’s still called the New York Times, but good luck finding any section of the print edition that’s devoted exclusively to news from New York. The paper’s March 23 edition ran a “Note to Our Readers,” in which it said the New York section would not be appearing that day. It hasn’t returned since. “There is no separate New York section,” the March 23 note said as the coronavirus had begun ravaging the city and was seemingly the only story in town. “New York coverage is included as part of the Tracking an Outbreak section on pages A4-A13.” That was the last time the New York section was mentioned, and there has been no note to explain where it went....
    Republicans were outraged at the idea of Russia placing a bounty for the killing of American forces. Or at least they were so long as they thought surely Donald Trump hadn’t known about that one. Now that it’s clear Trump very much did know, Republicans are starting to move to a new position—one that says a foreign nation engaging in proxy war against the United States by paying for the murder of American forces is simply not worthy of Trump’s time. To simplify the questions that come up in most scandals: How much did Donald Trump know? Everything. When did he know it? A year ago.  Next up is sure to be the “But Putin denies it, so everything’s cool” phase. However, before Republicans...
    Leading intelligence community officials are speaking out following a news report about Russia paying the Taliban to kill US troops in Afghanistan — denouncing leaks of sensitive information to the media. CIA Director Gina Haspel, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe and National Security Advisor Robert O’Brien each released statements on Monday in which they condemned such information getting out to the public. All three of the statements were similar in messaging, all declining to confirm the report itself, saying that the intelligence was still being assessed. The statements also mirrored one another due to the concerns they raised over leaks from top intelligence officials. “We are still investigating the alleged interference referenced in media reporting and we will brief...
    Apple News + is the subscription service to newspapers and magazines that the company launched last year, although Apple News has really existed since 2015. However, the deployment of this service has been very, very slow, it is only present in USA, Canada, UK and Australia. One of the great strengths of the service was The New York Times, however the well-known newspaper has just reported that its collaboration with the Apple platform ceases. That means that all articles in The New York Times are no longer available on Apple’s news platform. The newspaper itself has given its explanations in an article that can be read on its website. Little relationship with readers, and little control It seems that Apple...
    U.S. President Donald Trump walks to Air Force One from the Marine One helicopter as he departs on a day trip to Arizona and a visit to the U.S.-Mexico border, leaving Washington from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., June 23, 2020.Carlos Barria | Reuters President Donald Trump received a written briefing in February about intelligence regarding potential bounties offered by Russians to Afghan militants to kill American servicemembers, The New York Times reported Monday night, citing two officials with knowledge of the matter. The Associated Press also reported that the White House was aware of intelligence that Russians had placed bounties on U.S. troops in 2019. Trump and the White House have denied that the president had been briefed on...
    Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., blasted House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., as "immature" and "sophomoric" Monday for implying that President Trump has been blackmailed by the Russian government. "You know, you can only be young once, but you can always be immature," Kennedy told "The Story." "The speaker has made a number of sophomoric observations like that, and I think we just have to ignore her." MCENANY: PELOSI 'PLAYING POLITICS' WITH FALSE REPORTING ON RUSSIAN BOUNTIES FOR US TROOPS On Sunday, Pelosi responded to a New York Times report that Moscow had offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants to kill American troops in Afghanistan by telling ABC's "This Week" that she did not know "what the Russians have on the president politically, personally, financially or whatever it is." "This is as bad as...
    White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany fired back at the New York Times over a bombshell report that Russia paid bounties to the Taliban to target and kill U.S. troops. Critics of President Donald Trump pounced on the report to criticize him for either not knowing about the Russian scheme, or not doing anything about it. The president addressed the controversy in a tweet on Sunday and denied the allegations. "Intel just reported to me that they did not find this info credible, and therefore did not report it to me or @VP. Possibly another fabricated Russia Hoax, maybe by the Fake News @nytimesbooks, wanting to make Republicans look bad!!!" the president...
    The White House held a briefing for Republican members of Congress on Monday afternoon about the intelligence report that Russia offered to pay members of the Taliban to kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan because the intelligence and one of those lawmakers revealed the payments went back longer that originally reported.  Republican Congressman Jim Banks of Indiana, after he left the briefing, tweeted that the payments went back to his service in Afghanistan. He was deployed in Afghanistan during Operations Enduring Freedom and Freedom’s Sentinel in 2014 and 2015, according to his official biography, and he currently serves in the U.S. Navy Reserve as a Supply Corps officer.  'Having served in Afghanistan during the time the alleged bounties were placed, no one is...
    White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany blasted The New York Times Monday over what she claimed was "false" reporting about whether President Trump was briefed about intelligence that Russia paid Taliban-linked militants bounties to kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan. McEnany took issue with the Times' "erroneous reporting" that President Trump was briefed on the intel, saying that the president is only briefed on verified intelligence and claiming there were "dissenting opinions” within the intelligence community. Trump himself has denied on Twitter that he or Vice President Mike Pence were briefed on the matter. McEnany wrapped up the press briefing by slamming the Times' "absolutely irresponsible decision" to "falsely report" that the president was briefed. DONALD TRUMP JR. CALLS OUT MEDIA FOR NOT PRESSURING JOE BIDEN TO DO PRESS CONFERENCES "I really think...
    The New York Times on Monday said it’s withdrawing from its partnership with Apple News amid tensions grow between news publishers and the tech companies that profit off that content.  The Times is pulling out of its agreement with Apple because the iPhone-maker did not give it enough power — including through interaction with readers — to add paying subscribers. Stories read on Apple News are presented in the app, rather than redirecting to a publication’s website. For the Times, the situation was no longer acceptable. The move means that New York Times articles will no longer be available on the Apple News app, which in April reported 125 million monthly active users. “Core to a healthy model between The...
    The New York Times has announced that, as of today, it will no longer be distributing articles in the Apple News app, making it one of the largest publishers to end its association with Apple’s publishing platform. In a memo announcing the change, Meredith Kopit Levien, chief operating officer at the Times, said the company wants “a direct path for sending those readers back into our environments, where we control the presentation of our report, the relationships with our readers, and the nature of our business rules.” She added that the paper’s “relationship with Apple News does not fit within these parameters.” While Apple has had a tougher time getting publishers (including the Times) to sign on for its...
    White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany ended Monday’s press briefing by calling for both the New York Times and Washington Post to hand in their Pulitzer prizes. The New York Times reported on Saturday that President Donald Trump had been told in March that Russia had “secretly offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants for killing coalition forces in Afghanistan — including targeting American troops.” McEnany disputed the Times’ reporting adding the  President had never been briefed on the matter and their was “no consensus” among the intelligence community. “How is he certain that Russia didn’t put out the bounty?” a reporter asked McEnany. (RELATED: McEnany Says ‘Egregious’ Russia Bounty Story Leak To NYT Is ‘Just Dead Wrong’) She responded, “The president...
    Articles from The New York Times will no longer appear in the Apple News app. Today, the NYT announced that it is ending its partnership with Apple News. The issue seems to be that while other services, like Google News, send readers to publishers’ websites, Apple News generally keeps readers in the app. Or, as NYT puts it, Apple’s approach does not align with The Times’ goal of building direct relationships with paying readers. “Core to a healthy model between The Times and the platforms is a direct path for sending those readers back into our environments, where we control the presentation of our report, the relationships with our readers, and the nature of our business rules,” Meredith Kopit Levien,...
    The New York Times has decided to end its partnership with Apple News. Reports from the newspaper will no longer be featured on Apple's news platform starting on Monday. “Core to a healthy model between The Times and the platforms is a direct path for sending those readers back into our environments, where we control the presentation of our report, the relationships with our readers, and the nature of our business rules,” Meredith Kopit Levien, chief operating officer, wrote in a memo to employees. “Our relationship with Apple News does not fit within these parameters.” An Apple spokesman said that the New York Times “only offered Apple News a few stories a day,” and added that, “We are also committed...
    White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany was confronted at Monday’s White House press briefing over the report about Russian bounties to Taliban-linked militants, leading her to criticize The New York Times. The Times initially reported that Russia offered bounties to militants to kill U.S. troops, and that President Donald Trump was briefed on it. In the past few days, the Trump administration has pushed back on the reporting, with the president himself claiming that it was not reported to him because intel agencies “did not find this info credible.” McEnany insisted he still had not been briefed as of Monday, despite wall-to-wall media coverage. During the Monday briefing, one reporter asked, “If he hasn’t been briefed, how is he...
    The New York Times reported on Saturday that former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper’s (D) ethics scandal has complicated Democrat’s strategy for retaking the Senate majority. The Times wrote: For months, Democrats have figured that Colorado’s U.S. Senate race, a linchpin of their strategy to take back the majority in November, was essentially in the bag, with the Republican incumbent Cory Gardner trailing by double digits behind their candidate John Hickenlooper, the well-liked and well-known former two-term governor and Denver mayor. The Times said that Hickenlooper was “coaxed” into running for Sen. Cory Gardner’s (D-CO) seat after ending his failed presidential bid. Now, the former Democrat governor faces an increasingly competitive Senate primary against former Colorado state House speaker Andrew Romanoff, who has...
    The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), the White House, and President Donald Trump are all pushing back on a New York Times report that claimed that Trump was briefed about an alleged Russian military unit that secretly offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants for killing coalition forces in Afghanistan. “The intelligence finding was briefed to President Trump, and the White House’s National Security Council discussed the problem at an interagency meeting in late March, the officials said,” The New York Times reported. “Officials developed a menu of potential options — starting with making a diplomatic complaint to Moscow and a demand that it stop, along with an escalating series of sanctions and other possible responses, but the White...
    Donald Trump has insisted 'nobody told him' that Russia had reportedly offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants if they killed U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan.  In a series of tweets Sunday morning, the president scathed: 'Nobody briefed or told me, VP Pence, or Chief of Staff Mark Meadows about the so-called attacks on our troops in Afghanistan by Russians, as reported through an 'anonymous source' by the Fake News New York Times. 'Everybody is denying it & there have not been many attacks on us.....' Trump continued. The president also insisted that 'nobody has been tougher on Russia' than his administration, adding: 'With Corrupt Joe Biden & Obama, Russia had a field day, taking over important parts of Ukraine. 'Where’s Hunter?' the president asked....
    Joe Biden lashed out at President Donald Trump on Saturday for a newspaper article that, if true, he said, contains a “truly shocking revelation” about the commander-in-chief and his failure to protect US forces in Afghanistan and confront Russia. . The New York Times reported Friday that US intelligence officials concluded months ago that a Russian military intelligence unit secretly offered rewards to Taliban-linked fighters for killing US troops in Afghanistan. According to the text, the Russians last year offered the rewards for effective attacks, when the United States and the Taliban held talks to end the protracted war. “The truly shocking revelation of the Times if it is true, and I emphasize again, is that President Trump, the...
    (CNN)US intelligence concluded months ago that Russian military intelligence offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants to kill coalition forces in Afghanistan, including US troops, amid peace talks, according to a New York Times report published Friday.Citing officials briefed on the matter, the Times reported that President Donald Trump was briefed on the intelligence findings and that the White House's National Security Council held a meeting about it in late March.CNN has reached out to the NSC, the Defense Department, the State Department, and the CIA, and has received no comment.According to the Times, the Trump administration held expanded briefings about the intelligence assessment this week and shared information about it with the British government, whose forces were also believed to have...
    Bob Brigham June 27, 2020 7:39PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Raw Story President Donald Trump has refused to authorize any response after being briefed that Russia was offering bounties for the killing of U.S. troops, according to a bombshell new report in The New York Times. "American intelligence officials have concluded that a Russian military intelligence unit secretly offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants for killing coalition forces in Afghanistan — including targeting American troops — amid the peace talks to end the long-running war there," the newspaper reported, citing "officials briefed on the matter." : "The United States concluded months ago that the Russian unit, which has been linked to assassination attempts and other covert operations in Europe intended to...
    The New York Times is urging readers to overlook a woman’s crime because of her contribution to feminism: A manifesto that argued for the extermination of men. Valerie Solanas shot Andy Warhol in his studio in 1968. He nearly died. Yet Solanas is now getting a positive writeup in the Times’ new series called Overlooked, which is “a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times.” Solanas gets an article because of her contributions to feminism. “She made daring arguments in ‘SCUM Manifesto,’ her case for a world without men. But her legacy as a writer and thinker was overshadowed by a violent act,” reads the sub-headline for the article. The Times...
    Famous people whove had COVID-19 Gap stock soars as Kanye touts deal with his fashion brand Bill Simmons addresses New York Times story about the lack of diversity at The Ringer Bill Simmons began the Friday episode of his podcast addressing a recent story published in The New York Times that detailed the increasing internal concern about the lack of diversity at The Ringer, a digital media company he founded in 2016 and sold to Spotify earlier this year. © Don Juan Moore Bill Simmons founded The Ringer in 2016. “I only wanted to say two things,” he said to start the episode titled, “Talking Movies with Don Cheadle and Rob Lowe.” Simmons, a 50-year-old Massachusetts native, acknowledged he knew The Ringer had not...
            by Kaylee Greenlee  The New York City legal system has more than 39,000 pending criminal cases after trials were postponed in February, the city confirmed to the Daily Caller News Foundation. Trials by jury were postponed, prosecutions decreased as officials aimed to decrease the incarcerated population and various hearings were held virtually, The New York Times reported. “Because of the pandemic pending matters in New York City Criminal Court are 39,200 cases. Of those about 12,000 are felonies awaiting transfer to Supreme Court for further action,” New York State Courts director of public information Lucia Chalfen told the DCNF. “This compares to a normal pending caseload of about 27,000 cases awaiting disposition in the Country’s busiest...
    Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo changed the state’s justice system in April 2019, forbidding judges from imposing bail on alleged offenders who weren’t convicted of violent felonies. The governor amended the system a year later, allowing bail to be imposed on 15 certain classes of criminals like child molesters and those accused of vehicular manslaughter in addition to dangerous felons. Cuomo’s changes don’t take root until July, and since his reform has become law in the Empire State countless violent and non-violent alleged criminals have left jail promptly, despite committing grizzly crimes. New York’s 2019 overhaul of bail laws allowed those accused of everything from child sex trafficking to financially supporting terrorism to walk the streets without...
    New York Times employees are at odds over another sensitive editorial decision, marking the latest flare-up within the paper of record that has been roiled by internal strife over the past several months. Late on Monday, the science and philosophy writer who founded the blog Slate Star Codex announced that he was shutting down his widely read site over what he said was a forthcoming story in the Times that would share his real identity. Scott Alexander, the psychiatrist who helms the blog and writes under his first and middle name, said that he did not want to reveal his full name because of past death threats made against him, as well as fear that it would put his psychiatric...
    New York (CNN Business)McDonald's has closed its iconic restaurant on 42nd Street in New York City's Times Square. The closure had been planned prior to the pandemic, the company said in a statement to CNN Business, noting that it "was a difficult decision." But McDonald's (MCD) will still have a large presence in the area. Workers remove a sign from a McDonald's restaurant on 42nd Street in Times Square. Last year, McDonald's opened a three-story location on 45th Street and Broadway, calling it the new McDonald's Flagship Times Square. That location seats about 170 people and showcases the company's digital ordering kiosks. The 42nd Street location closure "allows us to focus on serving customers a few blocks away at...
    Igor Derysh June 24, 2020 3:09PM (UTC) Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden leads Donald Trump by 14 points in a New York Times/Siena poll released Wednesday as the president's approval rating continues to plummet. Biden tops Trump 50-36 with 14% of voters undecided, according to the poll, which surveyed more than 1,300 registered voters. : While Trump leads among white voters with no college degree, Biden leads almost every other demographic group. Biden leads slightly among male voters and has a 22-point lead among women voters. He leads by 34 points among voters under 34 and by 23 points among voters between 35 and 49. He leads by 28 points among white voters with a college degree, 39 points among...
    The New York Times is laying off 68 staffers, primarily in its advertising division, but none in its newsroom or opinion section, according to an internal memo to employees sent Tuesday. The layoffs come as the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on most of the media industry due to declining ad revenue, with layoffs, furloughs and pay cuts impacting many major and small news outlets. “The eliminations are taking place in parts of the company that have seen a significant immediate impact from the virus, but they also reflect long-term trends in our business and are fully consistent with the company’s strategy,” reads the memo from New York Times President and Chief Executive Officer Mark Thompson and Executive Vice President and...
    Dan Froomkin June 22, 2020 9:05PM (UTC) This article was co-produced with Press Watch, a new website that monitors and critiques American political coverage. Please consider supporting Press Watch by making a donation. In Friday's New York Times, the paper's White House bureau chief, Peter Baker, tut-tutted the "normalization" of Donald Trump's presidency — as if he himself, along with his colleagues, weren't among the people most responsible for it. In a "White House Memo," Baker wrote about the damning things former national security adviser John Bolton says about Trump in his new book — revelations that Trump "sees his office as an instrument to advance his own personal and political interests over those of the nation"; that Trump is...
    New York City’s effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus through contact tracing has been hampered by the reluctance of many people who are infected with the virus to provide information to tracers, according to a report in The New York Times. The Times report said just 35 percent of the 5,347 City residents who tested positive or were presumed positive for COVID-19 in the first two weeks of the contact tracing program gave information about their close contacts. Lloyd Miller played bass in the garden of Roy Nathanson’s home in Ditmas Park as part of Make Music New York on Sunday. The concert raised funds for local restaurants and other businesses forced to close or provide only limited...
    The New York Times fact-checked a statement from President Donald Trump Saturday about murder rates in Baltimore and Detroit and said that the president’s claim was ‘misleading’ because he compared crime rates of cities to those of entire countries.  Trump said that the murder rates in Baltimore and Detroit are higher than those in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Afghanistan, according to the report. The Times labeled the claim as false but said that the president was correct about Guatemala and Afghanistan.  The article was written to fact-check the president’s claims during his rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, his first since the pandemic began. The authors wrote that “President Trump made multiple statements that were false, misleading or lacked evidence.” (RELATED: EXCLUSIVE:...
    Nikole Hannah-Jones, the creator of the New York Times’ now–debunked “1619 Project” said she would consider it an “honor” if all the devastating riots over the past few weeks were remembered as the “1619 Riots.” This tweet was up for two days before she deleted it Monday morning. Without any prompting, Hannah-Jones was remarking on a New York Post opinion piece titled “Call Them the 1619 Riots.” The premise of the Post piece is left-wing institutions, like the New York Times and its debunked “1619 Project” and the public schools embracing the debunked “1619 Project,” are deliberately creating a generation of angry, violent, embittered young people who have been led astray by the lie that America was founded on...
    The lead reporter behind the New York Times's Pulitzer Prize-winning 1619 Project appears to have deleted tweets that shared posts from an account pushing an unfounded claim that government forces were secretly attacking "Black and Brown communities" under the guise of fireworks demonstrations. "Read this," Nikole Hannah-Jones said in screenshots of the now-deleted tweets. The tweet thread Hannah-Jones shared alleged that the sound of fireworks heard in Brooklyn during recent nights was actually "a coordinated attack" by government forces aiming to "disorient and destabilize the Black Lives Matter movement." "This could also be the police attempting to retaliate against our calls to defund/abolish the police by creating the circumstances for a continuous public nuisance and then purposely...