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    LeBron James predicted before the season that he would average double-digits assists for the first time in his 17-year career 12 Hollywood Regency-Inspired Picks to Glam Up Your Home How To Sell Your Home For The Best Price Possible Ad Microsoft 17 Ways These $20 Lights Will Upgrade Your Home Ad Microsoft Beat The Heat With This $89 Mini AC Unit Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/19 SLIDES © J Scott Applewhite/AP/Shutterstock / J Scott...
    Several of the 2020 Democratic primary candidates favored the abolishment of the Electoral College. Or, as once-confident candidate Elizabeth Warren put it, “I plan to be the last American president to be elected by the Electoral College.” Furor over the Electoral College among the left arose from the 2000 and 2016 elections. Al Gore and Hillary Clinton, respectively, won the popular votes. But, like three earlier presidents, they lost the Electoral College voting — and with it the presidency. The Founding Fathers saw a purpose in the Electoral College. It ensured that small, rural states would retain importance in national elections. The Electoral College lessened the chance of voting fraud affecting the outcome of a national vote by compartmentalizing the...
    The U.S. Supreme Court has been in the headlines a lot this summer, ruling on matters inclduing LGBTQ rights in the workplace and a Louisiana law restricting abortion. But journalist Steve Vladeck, in an article published in Slate this week, emphasizes that the High Court doesn’t spend all of its time on famous cases. The justices, Vladeck points out, also have what University of Chicago law professor Will Baude has described as “the shadow docket” — which is “quietly shaping the rules of the upcoming elections, how governments can and can’t respond to COVID, the resumption of the federal death penalty, and more.” The high-profile cases that make the headlines, Vladeck observes, typically appear on the Supreme Court’s “merits docket.”...
    For most of the last 20 years, a rule has applied to the Supreme Court: All Washington, D.C. institutions leak, but the court doesn’t. Now, in a four-part series, CNN Supreme Court reporter Joan Biskupic has revealed details of the court’s inner workings, including deliberations the justices conducted behind closed doors with no one else present. The reports follow similar, less extensive reports Biskupic filed last year. They also follow some conservative opinion pieces fretting that Justice Elena Kagan might have swayed conservative justices to her side in the LGBTQ and contraception cases — essays that have sometimes looked as though they’ve been informed by inside information. Something appears to be changing in the culture of the court. In the...
    The Supreme Court by a 5-4 vote has denied a request to halt construction of President Trump’s border wall over environmental concerns. A number of groups, including the ACLU and Sierra Club, had asked the high court to get involved again after the justices last year cleared the way for the administration to use military funds for construction while the case played out in the courts. A federal appeals court had ruled against the administration last month, but the justices, for now, have given another temporary victory to the administration. "The fight continues,” said Dror Ladin, a staff attorney with the ACLU’s National Security Project. “Every lower court to consider the question has ruled President Trump's border wall illegal, and the...
    (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts had the majority on his side after the Supreme Court heard arguments on whether President Donald Trump's financial records could be released to congressional Democrats and a New York prosecutor, according to multiple sources familiar with the inner workings of the court. But the vote among the justices was close, and the narrow margin did not satisfy Roberts -- or his colleagues.They wanted a coalition of liberal and conservative justices -- as much ideological unity as possible -- for the decisions regarding presidential power, four sources with knowledge of the internal deliberations told CNN. It would take nearly two months to produce the two 7-2 rulings. About this seriesJoan Biskupic takes you inside the Supreme Court...
    (CNN)Justice Stephen Breyer appeared for a rare virtual interview Wednesday afternoon and said that once a justice takes the bench "politics goes out the window," adding that justices rule based on judicial philosophies. In a wide-ranging but brief conversation sponsored by the American Bar Association, Breyer acknowledged that politics might influence the appointment of a judge but not how he or she ultimately rules from the bench. "I've never seen politics in that sense" Breyer said. Ruth Bader Ginsburg resting comfortably in New York City hospital after non-surgical procedureHe did not speak directly about the term that ended in early July after the justices ruled on cases concerning the President's efforts to shield his financial documents from disclosure, among...
    (CNN)When the Supreme Court extended the 1964 Civil Rights Act to gay and lesbian workers in a landmark June ruling, the justices also protected transgender employees.But the case did not start out that way. In their private conference room in October with only the nine and no law clerks, the justices debated whether and how to provide the same anti-bias coverage for 1 million transgender workers, according to multiple sources familiar with the inner workings of the court.About this seriesJoan Biskupic takes you inside the Supreme Court with exclusive new details about how the court handled its pivotal term that dealt with LGBTQ rights, abortion and investigating President Donald Trump.Some justices raised concerns related to religious interests and shared bathrooms,...
    Late on Friday the Supreme Court again issued a fast-tracked ruling which decided that a Nevada church isn’t being discriminated against when it’s not treated equally to a Las Vegas casino. This story first appeared at The Signorile Report. The decision was 5-4, with Chief Justice John Roberts, once again, joining the court’s liberals. This was the second time the court ruled on this issue; previously a California Pentecostal church had claimed its rights were violated by coronavirus restrictions, and Justice Roberts joined the four liberals. He wrote a concurring opinion with the majority in May stating that the church was being treated no differently than any other public establishment that was shut down due to Governor Gavin Newsom’s orders....
    (CNN)Joe Biden's recent rise in national polls has led some Democrats -- myself included -- to fear that complacency will set in, and voters won't take the threat of President Donald Trump's reelection seriously. But there is something else that should be generating a great level of concern -- the effort by Republicans to use the Supreme Court to suppress voting across the country in an attempt to hold onto the White House and Senate. Jen Psaki Let's start with Florida. Recent polls have made clear that Florida is in play this November, thanks, in part, to Trump's mishandling of the coronavirus crisis and a surge of support for Biden among seniors. Read More But, last week, the Supreme...
    PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania — Vice President Mike Pence told Breitbart News exclusively that he and President Donald Trump consider the U.S. Supreme Court one of, if not the most, important issue in the upcoming presidential election, saying there may be nothing that rises to the level of appointing justices to the highest court in the land. Asked during an exclusive interview on Thursday that aired on Breitbart News Saturday on SiriusXM 125 the Patriot Channel about the possibility of several vacancies in the next presidential term, Pence said he and Trump know how important this is to many Americans. “There may be no issue more important to the life of the nation than the destiny of the Supreme Court,” Pence said....
     Presented by Facebook    Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Friday (thankfully). We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the daily co-creators, so find us @asimendinger and @alweaver22 on Twitter and recommend the Morning Report to your friends. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 129,947. Tuesday, 130,306. Wednesday, 131,480. Thursday, 132,309. Friday, 133,291. In a pair of decisions on the final day of its term, the Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump on Kanye West's presidential run: 'He is always going to be for us' Marie Yovanovitch on...
    Lou Dobbs unleashed a fiery rant about the United States Supreme Court, accusing the justices of being a part of the “deep state” and working in “orchestration with the radicals Dems from Capitol Hill.” The Fox Business host is no stranger to trashing Supreme Court rulings in the last few weeks. In June, Dobbs proclaimed “John Roberts has lost his mind” after the Chief Justice ruled in favor of not immediately ending DACA and preserving health protections for trans people. On Thursday night, Dobbs continued his SCOTUS broadsides during an interview with John Solomon, just hours after the Supreme Court ruled New York prosecutors can obtain President Donald Trump’s tax returns in a 7-2 decision. “The deep state extends, obviously, to the Supreme...
    President Donald Trump scored wins at the Supreme Court on Wednesday after suffering an uneven slate of decisions this summer, as the high court issued rulings on church schools' ability to fire employees and an Obamacare mandate on contraception. But the court has yet to issue a ruling on the case that most personally affects Trump – a case about whether the House and a New York prosecutor can get access to Trump tax return information. In the Obamacare case, the high court ruled 7-2 the administration acted properly when it allowed more employers who cite a religious or moral objection to opt out of covering birth control. A Trump administration regulation on contraception survived in a Wednesday Supreme...
    Washington (CNN)The Supreme Court is taking an unusually long time to complete its term this year, with decisions in five cases still under wraps days after the justices would have typically cleared out its docket for the season. The coronavirus pandemic can be partly blamed for the delay. Already, the justices broke tradition in May by holding oral arguments over the phone and broadcasting them live as much of the country was under lockdown.Chief Justice John Roberts was hospitalized in June after a fallWhile the court has so far issued opinions in dozens of cases, including several major ones last month dealing with LGBTQ rights, abortion and immigration, where Chief Justice John Roberts notably sided with the four liberals, some...
    By JESSICA GRESKO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that the first-ever women to hold two prominent positions at the court, handling the justices' security and overseeing publication of the court's decisions, are retiring. Pamela Talkin's most public role in nearly two decades as the court's marshal has been opening court sessions by announcing the justices' entrance into the courtroom and banging a gavel before court begins. She noted in 2005: “I’m the only person in the courtroom with a gavel.” But her responsibilities as marshal's job were vast. She served as the court's general manager and chief security officer, managing approximately 260 employees, including the Supreme Court's police force. Christine Luchok Fallon's name wasn't on...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that the first-ever women to hold two prominent positions at the court, handling the justices’ security and overseeing publication of the court’s decisions, are retiring. Pamela Talkin’s most public role in nearly two decades as the court’s marshal has been opening court sessions by announcing the justices’ entrance into the courtroom and banging a gavel before court begins. She noted in 2005: “I’m the only person in the courtroom with a gavel.” But her responsibilities as marshal’s job were vast. She served as the court’s general manager and chief security officer, managing approximately 260 employees, including the Supreme Court’s police force. Christine Luchok Fallon’s name wasn’t on any Supreme Court decision, but...
    Washington (CNN)The Supreme Court is taking an unusually long time to complete its term this year, with decisions in eight cases still under wraps days after the justices would have typically cleared out its docket for the season. The coronavirus pandemic can be partly blamed for the delay. Already, the justices broke tradition in May by holding oral arguments over the phone and broadcasting them live as much of the country was under lockdown.While the court has so far issued opinions in dozens of cases, including several major ones last month dealing with LGBTQ rights, abortion and immigration, where Chief Justice John Roberts notably sided with the four liberals, some closely watched ones have yet to be released. John...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on the Senate floor Thursday tore into Democrats for allegedly "threatening" the courts, the Senate and other "governing institutions" to get their way on policy. McConnell in the course of the six-minute-long remarks panned Democrats' efforts to make Washinton, D.C., a state, alleged threats to Supreme Court justices, talk of removing the legislative filibuster should Joe Biden be elected and more. McConnell, an institutionalist who has been a senator since 1985, is famous for his warning to former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., that he would regret removing the filibuster for federal judges — before removing the filibuster for Supreme Court justices himself. "No longer do disappointments for Democrats mean that Democrats need better...
    A year ago, almost to the day, writing for a 5-4 majority, Chief Justice John Roberts upheld the constitutional right of a property owner divested by a local government ordinance to sue for just compensation. The owner in Knick v. Township of Scott had failed to seek compensation in state court before filing her federal lawsuit. That meant her federal case should have been barred under the court’s 1985 ruling in Williamson County Regional Planning Commission v. Hamilton Bank. But no, reasoned the chief justice. If the justices upheld that precedent to foreclose Knick’s suit, they would be elevating their own wrongly decided precedent over the Constitution’s prohibition on government takings without just compensation. JOHN YOO: SUPREME COURT SWING VOTE – WHAT'S BEHIND JOHN...
    By JESSICA GRESKO and MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The biggest cases of the Supreme Court term so far have a surprising common thread. On a court with five Republican appointees, the liberal justices have been in the majority in rulings that make workplace discrimination against gay and transgender people illegal, protect young immigrants from deportation and, as of Monday, struck down a Louisiana law that restricted abortion providers. As surprising, Chief Justice John Roberts, a conservative nominated by President George W. Bush who has led the court for nearly 15 years, has joined his liberal colleagues in all three. Since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy in 2018, Roberts has played a pivotal role in determining how...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The biggest cases of the Supreme Court term so far have a surprising common thread. On a court with five Republican appointees, the liberal justices have been in the majority in rulings that make workplace discrimination against gay and transgender people illegal, protect young immigrants from deportation and, as of Monday, struck down a Louisiana law that restricted abortion providers. As surprising, Chief Justice John Roberts, a conservative nominated by President George W. Bush who has led the court for nearly 15 years, has joined his liberal colleagues in all three. Since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy in 2018, Roberts has played a pivotal role in determining how far the court will go in cases where...
    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that a Louisiana law requiring abortion clinic doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital was unconstitutional, as it placed an undue burden on women’s access to the procedure. In a 5-4 decision, Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the court’s liberal bloc, providing the swing vote in a case that had the potential reshape access to abortion in the United States. The chief justice last week similarly joined liberal majority decisions in highly polarizing cases that extended civil rights protections to LGTBQ people and prevented the Trump administration from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. In a 40-page opinion penned by Justice Stephen Breyer, the court drew...
    The US Supreme Court has ruled 5-4 that a law restricting abortions in Louisiana is unconstitutional in a landmark decision. The law required that doctors providing abortions have admitting privileges to nearby hospitals, which the justices ruled led to an undue burden on women. Chief Justice John Roberts joined liberal justices in the 5-4 decision in a blow to anti-abortion groups. The court struck down a similar policy in Texas in 2016, the opinion noted. This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court rejected an appeal Monday from a Chinese billionaire who was convicted of bribing United Nations officials to buy their support for a proposed U.N. center in Macau that was never built. The justices did not comment, leaving in place the bribery conviction of Ng Lap Seng, one of China’s richest men. The 71-year-old Ng is serving a federal prison sentence. Prosecutors persuaded jurors at Ng’s 2017 trial in New York that he paid more than $1.7 million in bribes in an effort to build a center to serve struggling Southern Hemisphere nations. Paul Clement, Ng’s Supreme Court lawyer, argued that his client was seeking formal support for a center he intended to build for...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The last time a Supreme Court justice announced his retirement in a presidential election year, most of the current justices were too young to vote. It was 1968, and things didn’t work out as planned. The nomination to replace Chief Justice Earl Warren failed in that turbulent year, and no justice has retired in an election year since. The pattern is not likely to be broken in 2020, despite persistent chatter that Justice Clarence Thomas could give President Donald Trump a seat to fill before the election. Retirements have tended to be announced in June, as Justice Anthony Kennedy did in 2018. But the conservative Thomas has made clear to anyone who has asked, including an interviewer...
    The Supreme Court on Friday dealt a blow to Texas Democrats who had asked the justices to allow expanded access to mail-in voting ahead of the state's primary runoff next month. The justices let stand an appeals court ruling that halted a U.S. district judge's previous order allowing any voter who cites concerns about the pandemic to vote by mail. Under current Texas rules, only voters with a “qualifying reason” — advanced age, disability, incarceration or planned travel — can mail in ballots. Republican state officials oppose broadening the criteria, citing the potential for fraud, though election analysts and fact-checkers have found that voting fraud targeting mail-in balloting is extremely rare. Texas Democrats have sought for months to expand the definition of “disability”...
    Bipartisan support for the Supreme Court has remained after its controversial rulings on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and LGBTQ discrimination, according to a YouGov poll released Thursday. After the 5-4 DACA ruling, which upheld the program for young immigrants and rejected the Trump administration's argument for ending it, Republican approval went down from 68 percent to 51 percent. Democratic approval for the conservative-leaning court rose from 30 percent to 56 percent after the ruling.  The court's DACA ruling last week allowed the program to continue after the president intended to end it in 2017. The administration has expressed disdain with the court and announced plans to repeal it again.  The court also ruled in a 6-3 vote to ensure workplace...
    By MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The last time a Supreme Court justice announced his retirement in a presidential election year, most of the current justices were too young to vote. It was 1968, and things didn't work out as planned. The nomination to replace Chief Justice Earl Warren failed in that turbulent year, and no justice has retired in an election year since. The pattern is not likely to be broken in 2020, despite persistent chatter that Justice Clarence Thomas could give President Donald Trump a seat to fill before the election. Retirements have tended to be announced in June, as Justice Anthony Kennedy did in 2018. But the conservative Thomas has made clear to anyone who...
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky Supreme Court will hold oral arguments next week in five cases on appeal from courts in Fayette, Franklin, Jefferson and Woodford counties. Justices will hear arguments in the cases by video conference next Wednesday and Thursday, a statement from the Administrative Office of the Courts said. Justices are hearing cases remotely in order to observe social distancing due the coronavirus pandemic. The public can watch a livestream of proceedings on the Kentucky Educational Television website. Justices heard their first arguments by video conference in April. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Kentucky
              WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday strengthened the Trump administration’s ability to deport people seeking asylum without allowing them to make their case to a federal judge. Immigration experts suggested the administration would use sweeping language in the majority opinion to bolster broader efforts to restrict asylum. The high court’s 7-2 ruling applies to people who are picked up at or near the border and who fail their initial asylum screenings, making them eligible for quick deportation, or expedited removal. Justice Samuel Alito wrote the high-court opinion that reversed a lower-court ruling that said asylum-seekers must have access to the federal courts. Congress acted properly in creating a system “for...
    WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration can deport some people seeking asylum without allowing them to make their case to a federal judge. The high court's 7-2 ruling applies to people who are picked up at or near the border and who fail their initial asylum screenings, making them eligible for quick deportation, or expedited removal.   The justices ruled in the case of man who said he fled persecution as a member of Sri Lanka's Tamil minority, but failed to persuade immigration officials that he faced harm if he returned to Sri Lanka. The man was arrested soon after he slipped across the U.S. border from Mexico.   Justice Samuel Alito wrote the...
    By MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration can deport some people seeking asylum without allowing them to make their case to a federal judge. The high court's 7-2 ruling applies to people who fail their initial asylum screenings, making them eligible for quick deportation, or expedited removal. The justices ruled in the case of man who said he fled persecution as a member of Sri Lanka’s Tamil minority, but failed to persuade immigration officials that he faced harm if he returned to Sri Lanka. The man was arrested soon after he slipped across the U.S. border from Mexico. The high court reversed a lower-court ruling in favor of the man,...
    By Andrew Chung (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday enhanced the ability of President Donald Trump's administration to quickly deport illegal immigrants, including asylum seekers, without judicial review, handing him a victory in a case concerning one of his signature issues in an election year. The justices ruled 7-2 in favor of the administration in its appeal of a lower court ruling that a Sri Lankan farmer named Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam had a right to have a judge review the government's handling of his bid for asylum. The justices found that limiting judicial scrutiny of his rapid deportation case, known as expedited removal, did not violate key safeguards of individual liberty in the U.S. Constitution. (Reporting by Andrew Chung...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration can deport some people seeking asylum without allowing them to make their case to a federal judge.The high court's 7-2 ruling applies to people who fail their initial asylum screenings, making them eligible for quick deportation, or expedited removal.The justices ruled in the case of man who said he fled persecution as a member of Sri Lanka's Tamil minority, but failed to persuade immigration officials that he faced harm if he returned to Sri Lanka. The man was arrested soon after he slipped across the U.S. border from Mexico.The high court reversed a lower-court ruling in favor of the man, Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam, who was placed in expedited removal proceedings...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City By Andrew Chung The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday enhanced the ability of President Donald Trump’s administration to quickly deport illegal immigrants, including asylum seekers, without judicial review, handing him a victory in a case concerning one of his signature issues in an election year. The justices ruled 7-2 in favor of the administration in its appeal of a lower court ruling that a Sri Lankan farmer named Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam had a right to have a judge review the government’s handling of his bid for asylum. The justices found that limiting judicial scrutiny of his rapid deportation case, known as expedited...
    The US Supreme Court is seen in Washington, DC.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images The Supreme Court sided 7-2 with President Donald Trump on Thursday in a case over a federal law that substantially limits the role that courts can play in reviewing deportation decisions in certain cases under a streamlined process known as "expedited removal."  The opinion was authored by Justice Samuel Alito, and joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. Justices Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote separate opinions concurring with the judgment. Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan dissented.  The law was challenged by Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam, a Sri Lankan asylum seeker who belongs to the Tamil ethnic...
    By Alison Dundes Renteln, The Conversation The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled in the important and much-anticipated case, Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, that the LGBTQ community is protected from employment discrimination. The 6-3 ruling took many by surprise, in part because two conservative justices were in the majority, and one of them, Justice Neil Gorsuch, wrote the majority opinion. In this transformative moment in U.S. history, when the public supports the recognition of fundamental human rights, including the right to marry the person of one’s choice, the law appears to be catching up with society. And the U.S. Supreme Court has decided cases in ways that reflect social realities. The principles of equality and nondiscrimination are at the heart...
    As the Supreme Court nears the end of its 2019-2020 term, it is becoming increasingly questionable whether the “conservative majority” that Trump appointees Gorsuch and Kavanaugh were supposed to have ushered in actually exists. Ever since his legally convoluted majority opinion upholding Obamacare against serious constitutional challenge eight years ago, Chief Justice John Roberts has provided conservatives plenty of reason to suspect he is not the “conservative” jurist in whom many had pinned hopes. However, a handful of decisions by the Court in the past two months have raised new red flags that the problems with the “conservative” majority run deeper than a single jurist. An additional concern is that recent public threats by leading Democrat senators directed against the...
    Americans have been fighting over guns with growing intensity since the onset of the culture wars in the 1960s. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court decided to sit back and let the battle rage. The court opted not to hear 10 different gun rights cases, including some that would have enabled the justices to clarify key questions about the scope of the Second Amendment. The court hasn’t decided a major gun rights case since 2010, when it said the Second Amendment applies to states and cities. Gun rights advocates, their appetite whetted by the landmark 2008 ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller, which established an individual right to gun possession, had hoped to rack up dozens of supplemental victories...
    Thursday’s decision by the Supreme Court to thwart efforts by the Trump administration to rescind the DACA program instituted by former President Barack Obama by executive fiat had conservatives perplexed given one of the justices in the narrow 5-4 ruling siding against the Trump administration was Chief Justice John Roberts, who was appointed by Republican President George W. Bush. During an interview with Huntsville, AL radio’s WVNN, Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-AL) questioned the ruling and noted that it could be revisited in the future. However, he also expressed his concern for the direction of the high court. “We’ve seen this time and time again through history that some of the justices on the Supreme Court be appointed by conservative presidents,...
    Nearly 14 years after his death, legendary singer James Brown may soon have his last wish fulfilled. The entertainer known as “The Godfather of Soul” and “The Hardest-Working Man in Show Business” – who died at age 73 in 2006 -- wanted millions of dollars from his estate to go toward helping needy kids get an education. A unanimous ruling Wednesday by the South Carolina Supreme Court may clear the way for that to happen, The Associated Press reported. Following a 14-year legal saga, the court ruled that Brown's last partner was not legally married to him – and thus has no rights to Brown’s multimillion-dollar estate. ATLANTA PROSECUTOR MAY OPEN JAMES BROWN DEATH INVESTIGATION AFTER WOMAN COMES FORWARD WITH...
    President Trump has promised to release a new list of conservative Supreme Court picks after the High Court blocked his administration from rescinding former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals order. The Supreme Court issued a Thursday ruling that the Department of Homeland Security violated the Administrative Procedure Act and moved to rescind DACA too quickly. The court did not say that Trump lacks the authority to eventually repeal the order, and Trump pledged to continue repealing the Obama-era directive. The court decision was a surprise win for progressive immigration advocates and a loss for the Trump administration. The court was largely split between its ideological blocs except for Chief Justice John Roberts, who sided with the four...
    Alex Thomas June 18, 2020 0 Comments President Donald Trump has had a rough week in the Supreme Court where the conservative-leaning high court has sided with the liberal minority in two landmark decisions. And now, Trump is wondering whether the court “likes” him. After the Supreme Court struck down his administration’s attempt to the DACA program for immigrant children, Trump mused on Twitter, “Do you get the impression that the Supreme Court doesn’t like me?” Do you get the impression that the Supreme Court doesn’t like me?— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 18, 2020Trump’s tweet about the Supreme Court followed another in which Trump said, “These horrible [and] politically charged decisions coming out of the Supreme Court...
    President Donald Trump called for more Justices to be added to the United States Supreme Court in the wake of its Thursday decision halting his bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. SCOTUS’ decision, written for the majority by Chief Justice John Roberts, came down nearly eight years to the day after former President Barack Obama launched the program. Trump previously announced his intent to end the program back in 2017, but was barred by a lower court, whose ruling was upheld on Thursday. (RELATED: Supreme Court Rules Against Trump Administration’s Bid To End DACA) WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 17: U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for an East Room event to announce the “PREVENTS Task Force”...
    The Supreme Court ruled against the Trump administration Thursday, blocking its attempt to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era program that provides legal status to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, The Hill reported. In a 5-4 decision, Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the liberal justices in ruling that while the Department of Homeland Security has the authority to end DACA, the administration has not adequately justified its reason for wanting to do so. "The dispute before the Court is not whether [Department of Homeland Security] may rescind DACA," Roberts wrote for the majority. "All parties agree that it may. The dispute is instead primarily about the procedure the agency followed...
    WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign.  The outcome seems certain to elevate the issue in Trump's campaign, given the anti-immigrant rhetoric of his first presidential run in 2016 and immigration restrictions his administration has imposed since then.  The justices rejected administration arguments that the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end DACA. 
    By MARK SHERMAN WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign. For now, those immigrants retain their protection from deportation and their authorization to work in the United States. The outcome seems certain to elevate the issue in Trump’s campaign, given the anti-immigrant rhetoric of his first presidential run in 2016 and immigration restrictions his administration has imposed since then. The justices rejected administration arguments that the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end DACA. Chief Justice John...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign. For now, those immigrants retain their protection from deportation and their authorization to work in the United States. The outcome seems certain to elevate the issue in Trump’s campaign, given the anti-immigrant rhetoric of his first presidential run in 2016 and immigration restrictions his administration has imposed since then. The justices rejected administration arguments that the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end DACA. RELATED: ‘My soul is tired’: I...
    The justices rejected administration arguments that the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end DACA. Chief Justice John Roberts, joined by his four liberal colleagues, wrote for the court that the administration did not pursue the end of the program properly. "We do not decide whether DACA or its rescission are sound policies," Roberts wrote. "We address only whether the agency complied with the procedural requirement that it provide a reasoned explanation for its action. Here the agency failed to consider the conspicuous issues of whether to retain forbearance and what if anything to do about the hardship to DACA recipients." The Department of...
    WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign. The outcome seems certain to elevate the issue in Trump's campaign, given the anti-immigrant rhetoric of his first presidential run in 2016 and immigration restrictions his administration has imposed since then. The justices rejected administration arguments that the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end DACA. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court that the administration did not pursue the end of the program properly. “We do not decide whether...
    WASHINGTON (AP) - People trying to read a big Supreme Court ruling got more suspense than they bargained for. When the high court announced Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a glitch on the court’s website meant many people trying to see the decision initially saw only a single page. It took about an hour, the court said, for staff to fix the problem and post the 172-page decision and another decision the justices issued in a case involving a natural gas pipeline that would pass under the Appalachian Trail. The gaffe on one of the court’s most highly-watched decisions comes as the justices are expected to issue...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — People trying to read a big Supreme Court ruling got more suspense than they bargained for. When the high court announced Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a glitch on the court’s website meant many people trying to see the decision initially saw only a single page. It took about an hour, the court said, for staff to fix the problem and post the 172-page decision and another decision the justices issued in a case involving a natural gas pipeline that would pass under the Appalachian Trail. The gaffe on one of the court’s most highly-watched decisions comes as the justices are expected to issue...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sided with energy companies and the Trump administration Monday in reinstating a critical permit for a proposed natural gas pipeline that would cross under the Appalachian Trail. The justices ruled 7-2 to throw out a lower court ruling that had canceled the permit for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. It would bring natural gas from West Virginia to growing markets in Virginia and North Carolina. Its supporters say the pipeline would bring economic development, thousands of jobs and reduced energy costs for consumers. Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for a majority of the court that the “Forest Service had the authority to issue the permit here.” Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan dissented. Other legal...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. The court decided by a 6-3 vote that a key provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 known as Title VII that bars job discrimination because of sex, among other reasons, encompasses bias against LGBT workers. “An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex,” Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote for the court. “Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Trump administration’s bid to throw out a California immigrant-sanctuary law that limits local police cooperation with federal immigration authorities. The justices’ order leaves in place lower court rulings that upheld the law. Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas voted to hear the administration’s appeal. The administration said the 2017 state immigrant-sanctuary measure conflicts with federal immigration law and makes it harder to deport people who are in the country illegally. California argued that encouraging local police to participate in federal immigration enforcement is counterproductive because it makes people less likely to report crimes if they believe they’ll be deported for doing so. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and lesbian people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. The court decided by a 6-3 vote that a key provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 known as Title VII that bars job discrimination because of sex, among other reasons, encompasses bias against gay and lesbian workers. A ruling on similar protections for transgender people is expected soon. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Washington — The Supreme Court on Monday turned away challenges to state laws placing restrictions on firearms, declining to take up the contentious matter of gun rights in the U.S. after sidestepping the issue in April. In declining to take up the appeals, the justices leave intact laws from states including New Jersey, Massachusetts, California and Maryland. Some of the laws require residents to meet certain criteria in order to get a permit, including demonstrating a specific need to carry a handgun outside the home. In the case out of Massachusetts, the justices declined to weigh in on the state's ban on certain semiautomatic firearms and high-capacity magazines. In the case from California, the justices turned away a challenge to...
    The Supreme Court is weighing whether to take a case of a Black Lives Matter activist who doesn’t want to be held liable for an attack on a police officer during a protest in Louisiana. DeRay McKesson, a top activist in the Black Lives Matter movement, is asking the justices to hear his case after the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled he was liable for an assault on a police officer at a rally outside a police station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 2016 following the police shooting of Alton Sterling, a black man. The case has been percolating in the courts for years but has taken on a new urgency with the rise of nationwide protest over...
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - The justices of the Alaska Supreme Court have called for improvements within the judicial system to ensure equitable and fair treatment for people of color. The four justices posted a letter online Friday saying there needs to be systematic improvements for African Americans, Alaska Natives and other groups. The letter is addressed to “Fellow Alaskans” and signed by Chief Justice Joel Bolger and Justices Daniel Winfree, Peter Maassen and Susan Carney. Justice Craig Stowers retired June 1, and his seat has not yet been filled. TOP STORIES Bigger than life: George Floyd known for big heart, good works, struggles with drugs, crime Republicans call on Joe Biden to take stand on Defund Police movement Bill de...
    BRASILIA – Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro joined a rally on Sunday on horseback as supporters urged the closing of the Supreme Court for investigating the right-wing leader, as one of its justices compared the risks to Brazil’s democracy with Hitler’s Germany. Deepening a political crisis during one of the world’s worst novel coronavirus outbreaks, Bolsonaro has slammed the top court for investigating his interference in police affairs and opening an inquiry into his supporters’ alleged libel and intimidation campaigns on social media. The former army captain and defender of Brazil’s 1964-1985 military government has denounced the investigations, suggesting “absurd orders” should not be followed and warning that the court may “plunge Brazil into a political crisis.” Bolsonaro flew in a...
    In a 5-4 decision from the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday, a request from a California church that challenged the state restrictions on attendance at religious services during the coronavirus pandemic was rejected. Conservative Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals, turning away the appeal brought by the South Bay United Pentecostal Church in Chula Vista, California.Read more 2 CA Churches Tied to COVID-19 Cases After Holding In-Person Services CDC Backtracks on Recommended Singing Limits for Places of Worship Battle Over Church Openings in California Could Hear from Supreme Court New Jersey Pastor Says 'Church is Essential' After Reopening The church argued the California Governor Gavin Newsom's state limits on the number of people who could attend church...