2020-08-06@06:43:30 GMT
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the SARS CoV 2 virus:

    At the beginning of the 21st century an epidemic of Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) took place caused by another coronavirus, SARS-CoV, first cousin of the current SARS-CoV-2. Everything learned about that virus is being important to better understand COVID-19. The main coincidence is that the keys of both viruses use the ACE2 protein as a lock. However, the SARS-CoV-2 key fits more easily into the lock, so to speak. And therefore, it opens the “door” and enters the cell with greater success. Hence, the probability of infection and spread of COVID-19 is much higher than that of SARS. In fact, this is one of the reasons that SARS-CoV-2 has caused a pandemic: its ease of entry into our cells. ACE2...
    Amid data released on Thursday of a daily record of 63,247 new cases of the coronavirus nationwide, the second time this week new infections reported in a 24-hour period had set a new record, doctors at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center stated that the majority of new COVID-19 cases they are seeing have been in a less vulnerable demographic, young people, and their conditions have not proven to be as perilous. Speaking at a news conference on Thursday, Dr. Graham Snyder, UPMC Medical Director of Infection Prevention, stated that the average age of new COVID-19 patients is under 30. “Our testing data indicates these cases are largely linked to younger people who contracted the virus while traveling or while socializing without masks...
    It is a finding that raises many questions and could substantially modify what is known so far about the virus that causes covid-19. But how do these stool virus findings affect what we know about the SARS-CoV-2 virus? Regarding the third point, the study that caught the most attention was led by researchers from the University of Barcelona. According to them, there was a presence of the new coronavirus in frozen samples, collected in Spain, since January 15, 2020 (41 days before the first official notification of a contagion in the country) and since March 12, 2019 (nine months before the first case reported in China). Experts cite at least five hypotheses. One is that patients may have received incorrect...
    An air filter could help fight the coronavirus pandemic by catching and killing the virus instantly. The device uses nickel foam that traps SARS-CoV-2, the viruses that causes coronavirus, and heats it to 392 degrees Fahrenheit. During testing, the filter proved to kill 99.8 percent of the disease as it passed through, along with 99.9 percent of anthrax spores. Researchers involved believe the innovation could be used in airplanes, office, schools and cruise ships to stop the spread of the coronavirus that is still sweeping the world. Scroll down for video  An air filter could help fight the coronavirus pandemic by catching and killing the virus instantly. The device uses nickel foam that traps SARS-CoV-2, the viruses that causes...
    Coronavirus — He coronavirus is proving to be very lethal, and the more than million of deaths registered so far, corroborates it. However, the coronavirus that originated in Wuhan is not the same as the one we found today. Its 30,000 letters engraved in its genome are different from those of today’s genome, and that can have consequences. A simple change in genome position 23,403; he change of a letter A by G. Only and exclusively this can explain even a lethal genetic disease. It’s about a change that can bring problems. Bette Korber, American biologist, together with her team, has observed how variant G614 has been imposed on D614 -previous- in most places around the world. The data...
    Coronavirus — Since the start of the covid-19 pandemic, a question that has haunted several scientists around the world is: how does this coronavirus invade and reprogram human cells to cause infection and cause death? Knowing the answer is crucial in the search for drugs capable of stopping the virus before it carries out these processes. An international team of scientists who have been exploring this interaction discovered several keys to how Sars-Cov-2 infects cells. The most surprising finding – which they managed to verify with extraordinary images – is that human cells infected by the coronavirus suffer a «sinister« transformation. The cells, following the virus’s instructions, develop long tentacle-like filaments, which are believed to aid rapid spread through...
    Nevan Krogan July 3, 2020 12:00AM (UTC) This article was originally published on The Conversation. Most antivirals in use today target parts of an invading virus itself. Unfortunately, SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 – has proven hard to kill. But viruses rely on cellular mechanisms in human cells to help them spread, so it should be possible to change an aspect of a person's body to prevent that and slow down the virus enough to allow the immune system to fight the invader off. I am a quantitative biologist, and my lab built a map of how the coronavirus uses human cells. We used that map to find already existing drugs that could be repurposed to fight...
    Coronavirus — Since the coronavirus pandemic broke out, we have become familiar with words like SARS-CoV-2 and especially COVID-19. Both scientific terms are related to each other, but they are different and do not allude to the same thing, although sometimes they have been used as synonyms. The first thing to note is that the new coronavirus that is affecting practically everyone is called SARS-Cov-2. This virus is a new type that can affect people and was first detected in December 2019 in Wuhan City, China.. SARS-CoV-2, which has also been called 2019-nCOV, falls within the family of viruses called coronaviruses that normally only affected animals, but also have the ability to transmit from animals to people, as we...
    by Athena Aktipis, Arizona State University and Joe Alcock, University of New Mexico Viruses walk a fine line between severity and transmissibility. If they are too virulent, they kill or incapacitate their hosts; this limits their ability to infect new hosts. Conversely, viruses that cause little harm may not be generating enough copies of themselves to be infectious. But SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the COVID-19 disease, sidesteps this evolutionary trade-off. Symptoms often don’t appear until after infected people have been spreading the virus for several days. One study of SARS-CoV-2 estimated that the highest rate of viral shedding, and therefore transmissibility, was one to two days before the person infected begins to show symptoms. Put simply, you only feel...
    (CNN)All living organisms mutate and adapt to maximize survival in their ecologic niche. For months, scientists have been looking into whether the novel coronavirus -- known as SARS-CoV-2 -- is mutating and becoming more transmissible or more lethal. Recent evidence points to a preliminary answer to half the question: yes, a study has found that the virus has mutated and the dominant strain today is now capable of infecting more human cells. But the scientists say more research is needed to show whether this changed the course of the pandemic, and it remains unclear whether this mutation is more lethal.Almost immediately after the outbreak emerged, researchers began looking for patterns of change among the tens of thousands of viral genome...
    Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here. A newly published study suggests that bats have indeed been the originator of SARS-CoV-2, after researchers found a novel coronavirus in the flying mammals that is “the closest relative of SARS-CoV-2 reported to date.” The research notes the coronavirus known as RmYN02 was discovered in 227 bats – from 20 different species – that were collected from Yunnan Province in China between May and October 2019. Although it does not appear that RmYN02 can bind to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibitors as SARS-CoV-2 does, it is genetically very similar. "Notably, RmYN02 shares 93.3 [percent] nucleotide identity with SARS-CoV-2 at the scale of the complete virus genome and 97.2...