2020-08-09@16:51:48 GMT
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wildlife trade:

    By Thu Thu Aung YANGON (Reuters) - An ad showing a civet cat cowering in a cage being offered for sale on Facebook was just one of hundreds that the social media giant has removed in a crackdown on Southeast Asia's illegal wildlife trade during recent weeks. "Not too wild, not too-well behaved. If interested, call..." the seller wrote on the post, using an account in Myanmar, a major source and transit point for the trade in wild animals. Facebook has a ban on the sale of animals on its platform. But, in the five months through May 2020, a report seen by Reuters showed World Wildlife Fund researchers had counted 2,143 wild animals from 94 species for sale on...
    Millions birds, tropical fish, turtles, and mammals and large volumes of wildlife products are trafficked domestically and internationally in and from Brazil each year according to a new report from TRAFFIC, a UK-based nonprofit that studies the wildlife trade. Brazil is home to 60% of the Amazon Basin, holds 13% of the world’s animal and plant life, and it also has at least 1,173 endangered species. The biodiversity hub has been under attack for the past 40 years, losing more than 18% of its rainforest to beef, soy, and illegal logging production. The new report shows the additional destruction to the rainforest specifically from illegal wildlife trafficking. By volume and numbers, river turtles and turtle eggs are illegally smuggled...
    HANOI, Vietnam — Vietnam announced Friday that it was banning wildlife imports and would close wildlife markets in response to renewed concerns about the threat from diseases that can jump from animals to humans, such as the virus that causes COVID-19. An order signed by Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc on Thursday bans all imports of wildlife dead or alive and includes eggs and larvae. It also merits tougher penalties for crimes involving the trade in wildlife. Vietnam has been a popular destination for wildlife products — often from endangered species — that are used in traditional medicine or in preparing exotic cuisine. The move comes amid increased scrutiny of the health risks of the wildlife trade as the world...
    Vietnam has banned the country’s wildlife trade as part of efforts to curb the risk of future pandemics. The directive bans imports of live wild animals and wildlife products and eliminates wildlife markets, including online sites. It also calls for tougher action against people involved in illegal hunting and trading of wild animals. However, the directive does not include animals involved in medicinal use or wild animals being kept as pets according to Nguyen Van Thai, director of Save Vietnam’s Wildlife. Still, the closure of the country’s wildlife trade is significant as Vietnam is one of Asia’s biggest consumers of wildlife products. The wildlife market in Vietnam often includes rhino horns, elephant ivory, and pangolins, which are suspected to...
    By HAU DINH, Associated Press HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Vietnam announced Friday that it was banning wildlife imports and would close wildlife markets in response to renewed concerns about the threat from diseases that can jump from animals to humans, such as the virus that causes COVID-19. An order signed by Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc on Thursday bans all imports of wildlife dead or alive and includes eggs and larvae. It also merits tougher penalties for crimes involving the trade in wildlife. Vietnam has been a popular destination for wildlife products — often from endangered species — that are used in traditional medicine or in preparing exotic cuisine. The move comes amid increased scrutiny of the health risks of...
    HANOI (Reuters) - Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc has issued a directive to ban the Southeast Asian country's wildlife trade with immediate effect in order to reduce the risk of new pandemics, a government statement said. The directive bans imports of live wild animals and wildlife products, eliminates wildlife markets, and enforce prohibitions on illegal hunting and trading of wild animals, including online sales, according to the statement issued late on Thursday. Vietnam is an important destination in the Asian region for illegal wildlife products such as pangolin scales and elephant ivory. There have also been seizures of rhino horns, which is believed to have medicinal value. In February, 14 conservation organisations in Vietnam sent a joint letter urging...
    The recent authorization in Burma of the breeding for commercial purposes of tigers, pangolins and other endangered species arouses the concern of the defenders of the environment, who fear seeing the increase in traffic to meet Chinese demand. This Southeast Asian country already serves as a platform for the illegal wildlife trade, which is estimated to total $ 20 billion worldwide. In June, the ministry in charge of forests discreetly gave the green light to private zoos so that they can submit applications for authorization to breed 90 species, including more than 20 in danger or on . of extinction. The ministry assured that the new list had been drawn up “in full respect of the law” and after...
    A new report has come out about a restaurant in Albania serving bear meat, just one of many problems with the wildlife trade in the country. Researchers said it was the first instance of cooked bear meat in Europe and that it could be the start of a troubling trend of wildlife trade and animal meat in the area. Experts have warned that the coronavirus and wildlife trade are linked and that butchering and serving animals, like bear or other wild animals, could lead to additional zoonotic disease outbreaks.  Online marketplaces in Albania feature monkeys, bears and birds. While Albania has laws preventing the trade of wild animals, the enforcement of the laws are limited. A spokesperson for Protection...
    NEW DELHI — A camera trap photo of an injured tigress and a forensic examination of its carcass revealed why the creature died: a poacher’s wire snare punctured its windpipe and sapped its strength as the wound festered for days. Snares like this one set in southern India’s dense forest have become increasingly common amid the coronavirus pandemic, as people left jobless turn to wildlife to make money and feed their families. Authorities in India are concerned this spike in poaching not only could kill more endangered tigers and leopards but also species these carnivores depend upon to survive. “It is risky to poach, but if pushed to the brink, some could think that these are risks worth taking,” said...